An Intervention to Test the Adolescent Maternal Confidence Learning Model

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201768
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Intervention to Test the Adolescent Maternal Confidence Learning Model
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) A quasi-experimental design was used to test the Adolescent Maternal Confidence Learning Model. 102 participants were recruited from two sites with 54.9% (n = 56) from an alternative school for pregnant and parenting teens (control group) and 45.1% (n = 46) from a teen support group (intervention group). Subjects completed a demographic data questionnaire, the Maternal Confidence Questionnaire (MCQ), the Maternal Attachment Inventory (MAI), and the Baby Basics Knowledge Survey (BBKS). The control group was asked to return four weeks later to complete post-testing. The intervention group attended Baby Basics 101© classes once a week for four weeks. Upon completion of classed, post-testing was conducted. Maternal confidence: No evidence was found for a significant change in maternal confidence for Late adolescents compared with Middle adolescents. The difference between mothers who participated in Baby Basics 101 and the comparison group was not significant.  Maternal attachment: The difference on maternal attachment between the middle adolescent and the late adolescent group (t = -2.174, 96 df, p> .005) was not significant.  No significance was found between the control and intervention groups for maternal attachment.   At posttest there was a positive correlation found for the Baby Basics 101© group.  There was a significant difference in the level of knowledge of mothers who participated in Baby Basics 101 versus mothers who did not participate.  Results of this study indicate that although adolescent mothers were confident in their ability to parent their infant, they were eager to learn more about parenting to increase their knowledge. As adolescent mothers increase their knowledge of the parenting role, and increase their parenting skills, their outcomes and the outcomes of their infants should improve.
Keywords:
Baby Basics; Maternal Confidence; Maternal Attachment
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Intervention to Test the Adolescent Maternal Confidence Learning Modelen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201768-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) A quasi-experimental design was used to test the Adolescent Maternal Confidence Learning Model. 102 participants were recruited from two sites with 54.9% (n = 56) from an alternative school for pregnant and parenting teens (control group) and 45.1% (n = 46) from a teen support group (intervention group). Subjects completed a demographic data questionnaire, the Maternal Confidence Questionnaire (MCQ), the Maternal Attachment Inventory (MAI), and the Baby Basics Knowledge Survey (BBKS). The control group was asked to return four weeks later to complete post-testing. The intervention group attended Baby Basics 101© classes once a week for four weeks. Upon completion of classed, post-testing was conducted. Maternal confidence: No evidence was found for a significant change in maternal confidence for Late adolescents compared with Middle adolescents. The difference between mothers who participated in Baby Basics 101 and the comparison group was not significant.  Maternal attachment: The difference on maternal attachment between the middle adolescent and the late adolescent group (t = -2.174, 96 df, p> .005) was not significant.  No significance was found between the control and intervention groups for maternal attachment.   At posttest there was a positive correlation found for the Baby Basics 101© group.  There was a significant difference in the level of knowledge of mothers who participated in Baby Basics 101 versus mothers who did not participate.  Results of this study indicate that although adolescent mothers were confident in their ability to parent their infant, they were eager to learn more about parenting to increase their knowledge. As adolescent mothers increase their knowledge of the parenting role, and increase their parenting skills, their outcomes and the outcomes of their infants should improve.en_GB
dc.subjectBaby Basicsen_GB
dc.subjectMaternal Confidenceen_GB
dc.subjectMaternal Attachmenten_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:51:49Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:51:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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