Impact of TeamSTEPPS® Simulation-Based Training on Progressive Care Nurse Performance and Confidence Related to Failure to Rescue

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201773
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of TeamSTEPPS® Simulation-Based Training on Progressive Care Nurse Performance and Confidence Related to Failure to Rescue
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Background: Patients in progressive care (PCU) settings are at high risk for physiologic deterioration. Nurses practicing in PCU settings must possess solid knowledge of early warning signs (EWS) of patient physiologic decline, strong technical and non-technical communication skills and confidence to act accordingly to prevent patient failure to rescue.  Adoption of innovative, evidence-based strategies to augment the development of professional nursing excellence remains paramount. Traditionally, educational programs for staff nurses have focused on aptitude and skill acquisition. Self-confidence in applying knowledge and skill in a clinical setting is essential to improving practice and patient outcomes. Currently, the importance of reflective debriefing is emphasized as a critical component of the learning process to improve self-confidence and performance in practice. TeamSTEPPS® incorporating simulation-based team training (SBTT) uses a reflective strategy for training of healthcare providers. Limited research exists on the impact of TeamSTEPPS® SBTT on PCU nurse performance and self-confidence in recognition and management of EWS of failure to rescue. Methods: To investigate the impact of TeamSTEPPS®  SBTT on PCU nurse performance and confidence in recognition and management of EWS of failure to rescue, a quasi-experimental, nonequivalent control group pre- and post-test intervention study will be conducted. A preliminary report on the progress of the emerging study will be highlighted. Current evidence regarding the impact of SBTT on nurse performance and confidence in practice settings will be reviewed. The outcomes of a previous TeamSTEPPS®  SBTT curriculum study conducted in the trauma resuscitation setting within the same healthcare facility will be shared. Conclusions: Patients in PCU are acutely ill and at high risk for failure to rescue. Combining TeamSTEPPS® principles with SBTT has the potential to improve nurse performance and confidence in recognition and management of EWS of failure to rescue and may lead to improved patient outcomes in PCU settings.
Keywords:
confidence; simulation; TeamSTEPPS®
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of TeamSTEPPS® Simulation-Based Training on Progressive Care Nurse Performance and Confidence Related to Failure to Rescueen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201773-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Background: Patients in progressive care (PCU) settings are at high risk for physiologic deterioration. Nurses practicing in PCU settings must possess solid knowledge of early warning signs (EWS) of patient physiologic decline, strong technical and non-technical communication skills and confidence to act accordingly to prevent patient failure to rescue.  Adoption of innovative, evidence-based strategies to augment the development of professional nursing excellence remains paramount. Traditionally, educational programs for staff nurses have focused on aptitude and skill acquisition. Self-confidence in applying knowledge and skill in a clinical setting is essential to improving practice and patient outcomes. Currently, the importance of reflective debriefing is emphasized as a critical component of the learning process to improve self-confidence and performance in practice. TeamSTEPPS® incorporating simulation-based team training (SBTT) uses a reflective strategy for training of healthcare providers. Limited research exists on the impact of TeamSTEPPS® SBTT on PCU nurse performance and self-confidence in recognition and management of EWS of failure to rescue. Methods: To investigate the impact of TeamSTEPPS®  SBTT on PCU nurse performance and confidence in recognition and management of EWS of failure to rescue, a quasi-experimental, nonequivalent control group pre- and post-test intervention study will be conducted. A preliminary report on the progress of the emerging study will be highlighted. Current evidence regarding the impact of SBTT on nurse performance and confidence in practice settings will be reviewed. The outcomes of a previous TeamSTEPPS®  SBTT curriculum study conducted in the trauma resuscitation setting within the same healthcare facility will be shared. Conclusions: Patients in PCU are acutely ill and at high risk for failure to rescue. Combining TeamSTEPPS® principles with SBTT has the potential to improve nurse performance and confidence in recognition and management of EWS of failure to rescue and may lead to improved patient outcomes in PCU settings.en_GB
dc.subjectconfidenceen_GB
dc.subjectsimulationen_GB
dc.subjectTeamSTEPPS®en_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:52:05Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:52:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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