2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201794
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Screening for Affective-Emotional Disorders in Primary Care
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Context: Affective-emotional disorders are common in primary care and cause substantial disability, but they often remain unrecognized. Screening is a frequently proposed strategy for increasing detection of depression and sustaining nursing intervention. Aim: To describe levels of depression, anxiety and stress (DAS) of users of an urban/rural health centre, analyse gender differences and the relation between depression, anxiety, stress and age.   Method: Descriptive analytic study with the Portuguese version of DASS-21 in a consecutive sample (n=784), 67.74 % female and 32.26% male, mean age 50.38, ranging 18-99 years. Results: 40% to 59% of individuals present some degree of affective-emotional disturbance (depression, anxiety or stress). Severe or extremely severe levels of anxiety and stress were found in around 20% of individuals and severe or extremely severe levels of depression in around 12%. Women show higher mean levels of depression, anxiety and stress. DAS are strongly and positively correlated. Individuals over 65 show higher levels of depression, anxiety and stress. Conclusion: These results show high point prevalence - higher than in other countries – and higher among the elderly. They also reveal differences according to gender and co-morbidity between the affective-emotional states. They ought to lead to the development of a local and community nursing strategy and a multidisciplinary intervention for the promotion of mental health and prevention of affective-emotional disorders, particularly in female and elderly individuals, thus reducing the weight of psychiatric disorders and the use of psychiatric medication, especially antidepressants.
Keywords:
anxiety; depression; stress
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleScreening for Affective-Emotional Disorders in Primary Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201794-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Context: Affective-emotional disorders are common in primary care and cause substantial disability, but they often remain unrecognized. Screening is a frequently proposed strategy for increasing detection of depression and sustaining nursing intervention. Aim: To describe levels of depression, anxiety and stress (DAS) of users of an urban/rural health centre, analyse gender differences and the relation between depression, anxiety, stress and age.   Method: Descriptive analytic study with the Portuguese version of DASS-21 in a consecutive sample (n=784), 67.74 % female and 32.26% male, mean age 50.38, ranging 18-99 years. Results: 40% to 59% of individuals present some degree of affective-emotional disturbance (depression, anxiety or stress). Severe or extremely severe levels of anxiety and stress were found in around 20% of individuals and severe or extremely severe levels of depression in around 12%. Women show higher mean levels of depression, anxiety and stress. DAS are strongly and positively correlated. Individuals over 65 show higher levels of depression, anxiety and stress. Conclusion: These results show high point prevalence - higher than in other countries – and higher among the elderly. They also reveal differences according to gender and co-morbidity between the affective-emotional states. They ought to lead to the development of a local and community nursing strategy and a multidisciplinary intervention for the promotion of mental health and prevention of affective-emotional disorders, particularly in female and elderly individuals, thus reducing the weight of psychiatric disorders and the use of psychiatric medication, especially antidepressants.en_GB
dc.subjectanxietyen_GB
dc.subjectdepressionen_GB
dc.subjectstressen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:53:12Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:53:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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