Evaluating Trends in the Use of Hand-Held Computing Devices to Enhance Client and System Outcomes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201799
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluating Trends in the Use of Hand-Held Computing Devices to Enhance Client and System Outcomes
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Background and Significance: In some healthcare organizations, the use of hand-held computing devices (HHCD) has become integral to delivery of care, enhancing client and system outcomes, provider and patient satisfaction, and utilization of human and financial resources. Regulatory requirements, financial constraints, complex patient care delivery, multi-generational nurse differences, and fostering environments conducive to patient and provider satisfaction, afforded the impetus to examine the use of HHCD. To understand the dynamics of this phenomenon, nurse scientists, educators and clinicians initiated an evidence-based practice project to critically appraise published discourse related to clinical innovations; infrastructure and processes; and creation, utilization and translation of current and emerging trends concerning HHCD. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was conducted using CINAHL, PubMed and Cochrane Review databases. Search terms included nursing, mobile technology, podcast, handheld computing, iPod, and PDA. Articles with relevant content not elicited in the search were identified from the reference lists and retrieved for appraisal. A total of 92 references were obtained, 53 were critiqued. Articles were reviewed by two team members using the Johns Hopkins Evidence-Based Practice Model. In the event of inter-rater reliability discrepancies, citations were appraised by the entire team. Results: There were no clearly identified best practices regarding the use of HHCD in nursing. Additionally, there is a paucity of literature regarding the efficacy of using HHCD in a variety of nursing settings. Evaluation of such device use also is lacking. Implication for the Future: As the use of HHCDs continues to rapidly expand globally, nurses must leverage this technology to enhance clinical and administrative practice, education, and research.
Keywords:
hand-held computing device; nursing; mobile technology
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluating Trends in the Use of Hand-Held Computing Devices to Enhance Client and System Outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201799-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Background and Significance: In some healthcare organizations, the use of hand-held computing devices (HHCD) has become integral to delivery of care, enhancing client and system outcomes, provider and patient satisfaction, and utilization of human and financial resources. Regulatory requirements, financial constraints, complex patient care delivery, multi-generational nurse differences, and fostering environments conducive to patient and provider satisfaction, afforded the impetus to examine the use of HHCD. To understand the dynamics of this phenomenon, nurse scientists, educators and clinicians initiated an evidence-based practice project to critically appraise published discourse related to clinical innovations; infrastructure and processes; and creation, utilization and translation of current and emerging trends concerning HHCD. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was conducted using CINAHL, PubMed and Cochrane Review databases. Search terms included nursing, mobile technology, podcast, handheld computing, iPod, and PDA. Articles with relevant content not elicited in the search were identified from the reference lists and retrieved for appraisal. A total of 92 references were obtained, 53 were critiqued. Articles were reviewed by two team members using the Johns Hopkins Evidence-Based Practice Model. In the event of inter-rater reliability discrepancies, citations were appraised by the entire team. Results: There were no clearly identified best practices regarding the use of HHCD in nursing. Additionally, there is a paucity of literature regarding the efficacy of using HHCD in a variety of nursing settings. Evaluation of such device use also is lacking. Implication for the Future: As the use of HHCDs continues to rapidly expand globally, nurses must leverage this technology to enhance clinical and administrative practice, education, and research.en_GB
dc.subjecthand-held computing deviceen_GB
dc.subjectnursingen_GB
dc.subjectmobile technologyen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:53:29Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:53:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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