Integrating QSEN Competencies: Preparing Nurses for Global Practice

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201801
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Integrating QSEN Competencies: Preparing Nurses for Global Practice
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Method The Health Information Technology Scholars Program (HITS) is a collaborative effort to transform nursing education. This initiative provided a year long faculty development program for selected scholars to promote implementation of new technologies throughout the nursing curriculum, as well as the dissemination of the results. We were privileged to be included in the 53 participants of the 404 applications for 2009. The framework for our proposal was the integration of the Quality and Safety in Nursing Education (QSEN) competencies in a pre-licensure nursing program. Results Nurse educators play a vital role in the development of the nursing profession and in the revision of education to prepare graduates to safely and effectively practice in a global health arena. Based on recommendations of the Institute of Medicine (IOM), all health care professionals should be educated to deliver patient-centered care as members of interdisciplinary teams, emphasizing evidence based practice, quality improvement, informatics, and safety (Finkelman & Kenner, 2009). Nurse educators should lead the revision of nursing curricula to include higher quality and safer healthcare delivery systems through the implementation of IOM recommendations. Conclusion Leading change in nursing education requires connecting people and knowledge to bridge the gap between nursing education and the practice of tomorrow. This requires embracing technology and informatics; developing and utilizing safety systems; valuing collaboration, teamwork, and active partnerships with patients; and their impact on outcomes. Transforming nursing education includes teaching for the future, utilizing technology in an environment that fosters a spirit of inquiry and develops knowledge management skills. This presentation will share ongoing challenges and successes associated with leading change within a nursing program. Finkelman, A. & Kenner, C. (2009). Teaching IOM: Implications of the institute of medicine reports for nursing education (2nd. ed.). Silver Springs, MD: The Publishing Program of ANA.
Keywords:
QSEN competencies; Informatics
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIntegrating QSEN Competencies: Preparing Nurses for Global Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201801-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Method The Health Information Technology Scholars Program (HITS) is a collaborative effort to transform nursing education. This initiative provided a year long faculty development program for selected scholars to promote implementation of new technologies throughout the nursing curriculum, as well as the dissemination of the results. We were privileged to be included in the 53 participants of the 404 applications for 2009. The framework for our proposal was the integration of the Quality and Safety in Nursing Education (QSEN) competencies in a pre-licensure nursing program. Results Nurse educators play a vital role in the development of the nursing profession and in the revision of education to prepare graduates to safely and effectively practice in a global health arena. Based on recommendations of the Institute of Medicine (IOM), all health care professionals should be educated to deliver patient-centered care as members of interdisciplinary teams, emphasizing evidence based practice, quality improvement, informatics, and safety (Finkelman & Kenner, 2009). Nurse educators should lead the revision of nursing curricula to include higher quality and safer healthcare delivery systems through the implementation of IOM recommendations. Conclusion Leading change in nursing education requires connecting people and knowledge to bridge the gap between nursing education and the practice of tomorrow. This requires embracing technology and informatics; developing and utilizing safety systems; valuing collaboration, teamwork, and active partnerships with patients; and their impact on outcomes. Transforming nursing education includes teaching for the future, utilizing technology in an environment that fosters a spirit of inquiry and develops knowledge management skills. This presentation will share ongoing challenges and successes associated with leading change within a nursing program. Finkelman, A. & Kenner, C. (2009). Teaching IOM: Implications of the institute of medicine reports for nursing education (2nd. ed.). Silver Springs, MD: The Publishing Program of ANA.en_GB
dc.subjectQSEN competenciesen_GB
dc.subjectInformaticsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:53:35Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:53:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.