Evaluation of the Integration of Genetics and Genomics into Nursing Practice

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201818
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluation of the Integration of Genetics and Genomics into Nursing Practice
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose: Genomics is redefining the health/illness continuum. Nurses, pivotal providers of quality healthcare services, are essential to applying genomic discoveries to patient care. The Essential Genetics and Genomics Nursing Competencies (2006, 2009) made this is an ideal time to benchmark competency of integrating genomics into nursing practice. The primary study aim was to assess genomic nursing competency as a basis to measure effectiveness of planned education.  Methods: Roger's Diffusion of Innovations theory guided this online survey utilizing a convenience sample of nurses accessed via nursingworld.org. The survey assessed knowledge, skills, and attitudes about collecting/using family history, beliefs about the usefulness of genomics in nursing practice, and use of genetic information in clinical decision-making. Results were tabulated and analyzed using descriptive statistical techniques.  Results: 620 RNs responded. Most were Caucasian, female and prepared at the baccalaureate level. 67% considered genetics very important to nursing practice but only 33% had heard of the Essential Competencies. 57% reported their genomic knowledge base as poor or fair. Respondents appreciated the role genomics plays in common diseases with 99% correctly answering a question about whether genomic risk (as indicated by family history) has clinical relevance for coronary heart disease.  However, 60% incorrectly stated that diabetes and heart disease are caused by a single gene variant. This discrepancy illustrates that most nurses appreciate the role genomics plays in common disease but have knowledge gaps. Conclusions: Most respondents thought genomics was important but felt inadequately prepared to incorporate genomics into practice and were unaware of the Essential Competencies. Knowledge gaps were found in all nurses regardless of level of education indicating that all nurses would benefit from a broad scale education intervention. Consensus Panel on Genetic/Genomic Nursing Competencies, Essentials of Genetic and Genomic Nursing: Competencies, Curricula Guidelines, and Outcome Indicators, 2nd Edition. 2009, MD: American Nurses Association.
Keywords:
Competency; Genomics
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluation of the Integration of Genetics and Genomics into Nursing Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201818-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose: Genomics is redefining the health/illness continuum. Nurses, pivotal providers of quality healthcare services, are essential to applying genomic discoveries to patient care. The Essential Genetics and Genomics Nursing Competencies (2006, 2009) made this is an ideal time to benchmark competency of integrating genomics into nursing practice. The primary study aim was to assess genomic nursing competency as a basis to measure effectiveness of planned education.  Methods: Roger's Diffusion of Innovations theory guided this online survey utilizing a convenience sample of nurses accessed via nursingworld.org. The survey assessed knowledge, skills, and attitudes about collecting/using family history, beliefs about the usefulness of genomics in nursing practice, and use of genetic information in clinical decision-making. Results were tabulated and analyzed using descriptive statistical techniques.  Results: 620 RNs responded. Most were Caucasian, female and prepared at the baccalaureate level. 67% considered genetics very important to nursing practice but only 33% had heard of the Essential Competencies. 57% reported their genomic knowledge base as poor or fair. Respondents appreciated the role genomics plays in common diseases with 99% correctly answering a question about whether genomic risk (as indicated by family history) has clinical relevance for coronary heart disease.  However, 60% incorrectly stated that diabetes and heart disease are caused by a single gene variant. This discrepancy illustrates that most nurses appreciate the role genomics plays in common disease but have knowledge gaps. Conclusions: Most respondents thought genomics was important but felt inadequately prepared to incorporate genomics into practice and were unaware of the Essential Competencies. Knowledge gaps were found in all nurses regardless of level of education indicating that all nurses would benefit from a broad scale education intervention. Consensus Panel on Genetic/Genomic Nursing Competencies, Essentials of Genetic and Genomic Nursing: Competencies, Curricula Guidelines, and Outcome Indicators, 2nd Edition. 2009, MD: American Nurses Association.en_GB
dc.subjectCompetencyen_GB
dc.subjectGenomicsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:54:31Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:54:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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