International Nursing Education Partnership for Care of an Aging Population: Simulation and Clinical Judgment Development

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201821
Type:
Presentation
Title:
International Nursing Education Partnership for Care of an Aging Population: Simulation and Clinical Judgment Development
Author(s):
Johnson, Elizabeth; Hodson-Carlton, Kay E.; Lasater, Kathie; Siktberg, Linda; Dillard, Nancy L.; Sideras, Stephanie; Meechan, Ronnie
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose: The aging worldwide population challenges educators to train larger numbers of health care leaders skilled in geriatric care (World Health Organization).  Although clinical simulation is used internationally to educate future nursing leaders, evidence linking simulation and clinical judgment is lacking.  For nurses, clinical judgment development is critical to meeting the WHO challenge. The purpose of this international multi-site study was to determine the effect of expert role modeling on students’ clinical judgment in the care of a simulated geriatric patient. Methods: A three-part unfolding clinical simulation of a geriatric patient with a hip fracture was implemented at four diverse US schools and one UK school (N = 221 US students, N = 54 UK students).  Students at each site were assigned to treatment or control groups and randomized to nursing roles within each part of the simulation. Treatment groups viewed a video of an exemplar nurse. A digital toolkit minimized variations between sites.   Results: Using the Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric, trained observers rated student clinical judgment from video recordings of the simulations.  Kruskal-Wallis analysis resulted in significant differences between the treatment and control groups for three of four clinical judgment dimensions for all schools: noticing (p < .001), interpreting (p < .001), and responding (p < .001). Significant differences (p < .001) in student perceived satisfaction with the simulation were found between treatment and control groups only for UK students. Conclusion: Findings suggest that clinical simulation with exposure to expert role modeling may contribute to improved clinical judgment development in the care of older patients.  Differences in perceived satisfaction between UK and US schools may be related to differences in international nursing programs.  International partnerships offer the potential for discovering best practices in nursing education and meeting the health care challenges of an aging worldwide population.
Keywords:
clinical judgment; international nursing education; clinical simulation
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInternational Nursing Education Partnership for Care of an Aging Population: Simulation and Clinical Judgment Developmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorHodson-Carlton, Kay E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLasater, Kathieen_US
dc.contributor.authorSiktberg, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.authorDillard, Nancy L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSideras, Stephanieen_US
dc.contributor.authorMeechan, Ronnieen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201821-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose: The aging worldwide population challenges educators to train larger numbers of health care leaders skilled in geriatric care (World Health Organization).  Although clinical simulation is used internationally to educate future nursing leaders, evidence linking simulation and clinical judgment is lacking.  For nurses, clinical judgment development is critical to meeting the WHO challenge. The purpose of this international multi-site study was to determine the effect of expert role modeling on students’ clinical judgment in the care of a simulated geriatric patient. Methods: A three-part unfolding clinical simulation of a geriatric patient with a hip fracture was implemented at four diverse US schools and one UK school (N = 221 US students, N = 54 UK students).  Students at each site were assigned to treatment or control groups and randomized to nursing roles within each part of the simulation. Treatment groups viewed a video of an exemplar nurse. A digital toolkit minimized variations between sites.   Results: Using the Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric, trained observers rated student clinical judgment from video recordings of the simulations.  Kruskal-Wallis analysis resulted in significant differences between the treatment and control groups for three of four clinical judgment dimensions for all schools: noticing (p < .001), interpreting (p < .001), and responding (p < .001). Significant differences (p < .001) in student perceived satisfaction with the simulation were found between treatment and control groups only for UK students. Conclusion: Findings suggest that clinical simulation with exposure to expert role modeling may contribute to improved clinical judgment development in the care of older patients.  Differences in perceived satisfaction between UK and US schools may be related to differences in international nursing programs.  International partnerships offer the potential for discovering best practices in nursing education and meeting the health care challenges of an aging worldwide population.en_GB
dc.subjectclinical judgmenten_GB
dc.subjectinternational nursing educationen_GB
dc.subjectclinical simulationen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:54:41Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:54:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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