2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201835
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Sikh Patient: A Review of the Nursing Literature
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Introduction: Nearly a half million Sikhs currently live in the United States. Thus, gaining cultural competency on caring for a Sikh when they become patients under our care, is a clear progression. This study examines research publications conducted in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom and mirrors them to US society as a means to better describe nursing care of the Sikh patient. Methods: This review of the literature was conducted by searching the keyword “Sikh*” in the CINAHL and MEDLINE databases. The initial search retrieved 415 article results. Criteria for including an article was discussing care of primarily Sikhs within the US, Canada or UK. Exclusion criteria included articles focused primarily on other major religions or not within the countries of interest. Finally, after all criteria for review were met, approximately 28 research articles were included. Results: Preliminary findings show that very little literature has been published about Sikhs as patients for care, or how a healthcare professional may enhance their cultural sensitivity to treating a Sikh patient. Of the literature that has been published, there is an overall consensus on the cultural adaptations for caring for Sikh patients. Many of the studies reviewed showed the importance of the religion in the healthcare recovery process. The findings include every aspect of care from birth customs to palliative care, and how the Sikhs diverge from the majority in each of these scenarios. Nursing implications are directly discussed in a large portion of these studies. These include understanding the extended family model, differences in food and lifestyle, and the importance of spirituality. Conclusion: All in all, the Sikhs are a unique and individual minority group in the United States. Learning the norms, beliefs and values of the Sikhs is vital to providing culturally competent or sensitive care to this growing portion of American society.
Keywords:
Sikhs; Review; Sikhism
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Sikh Patient: A Review of the Nursing Literatureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201835-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Introduction: Nearly a half million Sikhs currently live in the United States. Thus, gaining cultural competency on caring for a Sikh when they become patients under our care, is a clear progression. This study examines research publications conducted in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom and mirrors them to US society as a means to better describe nursing care of the Sikh patient. Methods: This review of the literature was conducted by searching the keyword “Sikh*” in the CINAHL and MEDLINE databases. The initial search retrieved 415 article results. Criteria for including an article was discussing care of primarily Sikhs within the US, Canada or UK. Exclusion criteria included articles focused primarily on other major religions or not within the countries of interest. Finally, after all criteria for review were met, approximately 28 research articles were included. Results: Preliminary findings show that very little literature has been published about Sikhs as patients for care, or how a healthcare professional may enhance their cultural sensitivity to treating a Sikh patient. Of the literature that has been published, there is an overall consensus on the cultural adaptations for caring for Sikh patients. Many of the studies reviewed showed the importance of the religion in the healthcare recovery process. The findings include every aspect of care from birth customs to palliative care, and how the Sikhs diverge from the majority in each of these scenarios. Nursing implications are directly discussed in a large portion of these studies. These include understanding the extended family model, differences in food and lifestyle, and the importance of spirituality. Conclusion: All in all, the Sikhs are a unique and individual minority group in the United States. Learning the norms, beliefs and values of the Sikhs is vital to providing culturally competent or sensitive care to this growing portion of American society.en_GB
dc.subjectSikhsen_GB
dc.subjectReviewen_GB
dc.subjectSikhismen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:55:30Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:55:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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