Opinions about Smoking Policies, Exposure to Secondhand Smoke, and Smoking Patterns of Undergraduate College Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201839
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Opinions about Smoking Policies, Exposure to Secondhand Smoke, and Smoking Patterns of Undergraduate College Students
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) College years are crucial for young adults in the establishment of life-style behaviors that can have a lifetime effect (Staten & Ridner, 2006). The purpose of this project was to assess undergraduate college students’ opinions of smoking policies, secondhand smoke exposure, and smoking in public places within a smoke-free campus. The Transtheoretical Model (Prochaska & DiClemente, 1983) provided the behavioral change framework.  An on-line cross-sectional survey was used to collect data. Surveys were emailed via Zoomerang to all undergraduate students at a private, Midwestern university. Survey questions contained 57 forced-choice or open-ended options. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Forty percent (n = 1,093) of those surveyed responded: 23% were freshmen, 23% sophomores, 24% juniors, 28% seniors, and 2% others. Subjects were female (61%), white (91%), a member of a social fraternity or sorority (30%), an NCAA athlete (7%), and lived in a resident hall (60%). Forty-three percent of the respondents were exposed to secondhand smoke in their environments. Fifty-five percent were unaware that the campus is a smoke-free environment, 96% have seen smoking on campus, and 71% believed the smoke-free policy is not enforced. Sixty-seven percent of the respondents agreed or strongly agreed that the campus should be a smoke-free environment. Thirty-eight percent (n = 415) of respondents admitted to smoking at some point in their lifetime. Twenty-eight percent (n = 308) indicated they smoked during the previous 30 days, but only 108 of these smokers identified themselves as a “current” smoker. Findings indicated that the rate of smoking was similar to national college data. The majority supported a smoke-free environment and believed the current campus policy was not enforced. Data from this study adds to the growing body of evidence about college students’ opinions concerning smoking and forms a foundation for an evidence-based project on smoking abstinence.
Keywords:
smoking cessation; Transtheoretical model; college students
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOpinions about Smoking Policies, Exposure to Secondhand Smoke, and Smoking Patterns of Undergraduate College Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201839-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) College years are crucial for young adults in the establishment of life-style behaviors that can have a lifetime effect (Staten & Ridner, 2006). The purpose of this project was to assess undergraduate college students’ opinions of smoking policies, secondhand smoke exposure, and smoking in public places within a smoke-free campus. The Transtheoretical Model (Prochaska & DiClemente, 1983) provided the behavioral change framework.  An on-line cross-sectional survey was used to collect data. Surveys were emailed via Zoomerang to all undergraduate students at a private, Midwestern university. Survey questions contained 57 forced-choice or open-ended options. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Forty percent (n = 1,093) of those surveyed responded: 23% were freshmen, 23% sophomores, 24% juniors, 28% seniors, and 2% others. Subjects were female (61%), white (91%), a member of a social fraternity or sorority (30%), an NCAA athlete (7%), and lived in a resident hall (60%). Forty-three percent of the respondents were exposed to secondhand smoke in their environments. Fifty-five percent were unaware that the campus is a smoke-free environment, 96% have seen smoking on campus, and 71% believed the smoke-free policy is not enforced. Sixty-seven percent of the respondents agreed or strongly agreed that the campus should be a smoke-free environment. Thirty-eight percent (n = 415) of respondents admitted to smoking at some point in their lifetime. Twenty-eight percent (n = 308) indicated they smoked during the previous 30 days, but only 108 of these smokers identified themselves as a “current” smoker. Findings indicated that the rate of smoking was similar to national college data. The majority supported a smoke-free environment and believed the current campus policy was not enforced. Data from this study adds to the growing body of evidence about college students’ opinions concerning smoking and forms a foundation for an evidence-based project on smoking abstinence.en_GB
dc.subjectsmoking cessationen_GB
dc.subjectTranstheoretical modelen_GB
dc.subjectcollege studentsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:55:43Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:55:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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