Predictors of Body Fat Redistribution in Persons Living with HIV/AIDS

10.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201842
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of Body Fat Redistribution in Persons Living with HIV/AIDS
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose: HIV disease and antiretroviral treatments can be accompanied by intense physical and psychological symptoms, including body fat redistribution. Lipodystrophy is often associated with increased illness perception and stigmatization. Amelioration of the anthropomorphic and metabolic changes, through provider-directed or self-care measures, can be challenging and often results in reduced medication adherence and impacts quality of life. The purpose of this study was to identify correlates of HIV-related lipodystrophic symptoms based upon a team-generated conceptual model exploring associations between personal characteristics, resources, illness perception and severity, and changes in symptoms, adherence and quality of life.   Methods: This study was a sub-analysis of 188 individuals who reported lipodystrophy in a randomized controlled trial (N=190) that tested a self-care symptom management manual. Data on body fat changes were collected at two time points (baseline and 2 months) at 3 sites in the southern United States. Descriptive and multivariate statistics were calculated on demographic variables, objective indicators and perceived body fat changes, illness perception, and stigma. Conclusions: 64.2% were male, 45.8% Latino, 37.9% African American and 14.7% Caucasian with a mean age of 42.2 years (SD 9.0). Significant (p<.05) correlates of lipodystrophy included illness perception (r=-.40), stigma (r=-.33) and quality of life (r=.32). Self-reported objective indicators of lipodystrophy did not correlate significantly with perceived body fat changes. Significant predictors of lipodystrophy (adjusted R2=.185, F=15.1, p=.000) included stigma (Beta=-.19, p=.014) and illness perception (Beta=-.28, p=.001). Implications: Interventions to reduce stigma and illness perception should be targeted to younger persons living with HIV to decrease negative perceptions of body fat changes. Clearly, these negative, cognitive indices have a greater effect than objective indicators of lipodystrophy upon the individual’s perceptions of their bodies. Clinician assessment should include both subjective and objective data related to lipodystrophic symptoms
Keywords:
Lipodystrophy; Stigma; HIV/AIDS
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of Body Fat Redistribution in Persons Living with HIV/AIDSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201842-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose: HIV disease and antiretroviral treatments can be accompanied by intense physical and psychological symptoms, including body fat redistribution. Lipodystrophy is often associated with increased illness perception and stigmatization. Amelioration of the anthropomorphic and metabolic changes, through provider-directed or self-care measures, can be challenging and often results in reduced medication adherence and impacts quality of life. The purpose of this study was to identify correlates of HIV-related lipodystrophic symptoms based upon a team-generated conceptual model exploring associations between personal characteristics, resources, illness perception and severity, and changes in symptoms, adherence and quality of life.   Methods: This study was a sub-analysis of 188 individuals who reported lipodystrophy in a randomized controlled trial (N=190) that tested a self-care symptom management manual. Data on body fat changes were collected at two time points (baseline and 2 months) at 3 sites in the southern United States. Descriptive and multivariate statistics were calculated on demographic variables, objective indicators and perceived body fat changes, illness perception, and stigma. Conclusions: 64.2% were male, 45.8% Latino, 37.9% African American and 14.7% Caucasian with a mean age of 42.2 years (SD 9.0). Significant (p<.05) correlates of lipodystrophy included illness perception (r=-.40), stigma (r=-.33) and quality of life (r=.32). Self-reported objective indicators of lipodystrophy did not correlate significantly with perceived body fat changes. Significant predictors of lipodystrophy (adjusted R2=.185, F=15.1, p=.000) included stigma (Beta=-.19, p=.014) and illness perception (Beta=-.28, p=.001). Implications: Interventions to reduce stigma and illness perception should be targeted to younger persons living with HIV to decrease negative perceptions of body fat changes. Clearly, these negative, cognitive indices have a greater effect than objective indicators of lipodystrophy upon the individual’s perceptions of their bodies. Clinician assessment should include both subjective and objective data related to lipodystrophic symptomsen_GB
dc.subjectLipodystrophyen_GB
dc.subjectStigmaen_GB
dc.subjectHIV/AIDSen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:55:54Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:55:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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