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Virginia Henderson International Nursing e-Repository > Sigma Theta Tau International (STTI) > STTI Biennial Convention > Hospital Work Environments, Nurse Burnout and Job Dissatisfaction: A View in the Mirror of International Evidence

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201847
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Type: Presentation
Title: Hospital Work Environments, Nurse Burnout and Job Dissatisfaction: A View in the Mirror of International Evidence
Abstract: (41st Biennial Convention) BACKGROUND:  International evidence has been extensively documented that work environments impact on patient and staff outcomes. However, limited evidence exists that this is also the case in developing countries.    Furthermore, the work environment in South Africa is recognized for it’s the divided healthcare system, the major shortage of staff, which is further exacerbated by poor retention of nurses, all of which place additional demands on the nursing workforce and greatly affect nurse burnout, job dissatisfaction and intent to leave. OBJECTIVE:  To provide a comprehensive synthesis of data from private and public hospitals in South Africa to explain the relationship between the quality of hospital nurse work environments in South Africa and nurse burnout, job dissatisfaction and intent to leave. METHODS:  The data is derived from the Registered Nurse Forecast (RN4CAST) study that was conducted in 10 European Union Countries, as well as China, South Africa and Botswana.  Instruments include the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Environment, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, and measures of nurse qualifications, nurse to patient workloads, nurse ratings of quality care and frequency of adverse patient outcomes. RESULTS:  A significant link was found between the quality of hospital nurse work environments in private and public hospitals in South Africa and nurse burnout, job dissatisfaction and intent to leave. The results support international evidence that hospitals with better quality nurse work environments have lower rates of nurse burnout, job dissatisfaction and intent to leave. However, for the first time in South Africa we have national evidence to influence policy. CONCLUSIONS:  Reform of hospital nurse work environments in the private and public healthcare sectors in South Africa are likely to moderate nurse burnout and job dissatisfaction, improving the retention of nurses in hospital practice.
Keywords: intend to leave
job satisfaction
work environments
Repository Posting Date: 11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication: 4-Jan-2012
Sponsors: Sigma Theta Tau International
Appears in Collections: STTI Biennial Convention

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