2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201852
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Promotion of Nurses: The Case of Spirituality
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Nurses’ work is generally understood to be inherently spiritual (Wright, 2002) not only because they address the spiritual needs of patients, but also because they experience their work as meaningful and purposive.  Addressing the spiritual needs of nurses is important for their general well-being.  Few studies address these needs via interventions (Bay et al. 2010), however there is little evidence supporting their effectiveness.  More research is needed that investigates the actual spiritual needs of nurses, rather than assume them.  The purpose of this study was to understand the spiritual needs of staff nurses in an effort to design and test intervention strategies in the future. Eleven staff nurses, from various medical-surgical units from one hospital, participated in two separate focus groups. In this qualitative study, two major themes emerged from the data: ‘caring for the patient’ and ‘caring for one self’.  In ‘caring for oneself’, participants identified spirituality as a major component of their general well-being and ability to do their work well. Participants also valued being there for patients, ‘I think what is meaningful is to make someone’s life comfortable.’ And participants discussed the value of coworkers, ‘And having support of the manager and staff.’ Spiritual well-being was talked about as both a personal and an institutional matter: personal in that participants spoke about remembering to take time for themselves after work hours (such as massage or exercise); and institutional in that participants suggested obtaining more support from supervisors, clergy, other colleagues and social (on line) networks.  Previous research suggests that nurses practice few health promoting activities (Richards et al. 2006). This study reminds us that the spiritual well-being of nurses should be part of the health promotion efforts of the global community of nurses.
Keywords:
health promotion; self-care; spirituality
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Promotion of Nurses: The Case of Spiritualityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201852-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Nurses’ work is generally understood to be inherently spiritual (Wright, 2002) not only because they address the spiritual needs of patients, but also because they experience their work as meaningful and purposive.  Addressing the spiritual needs of nurses is important for their general well-being.  Few studies address these needs via interventions (Bay et al. 2010), however there is little evidence supporting their effectiveness.  More research is needed that investigates the actual spiritual needs of nurses, rather than assume them.  The purpose of this study was to understand the spiritual needs of staff nurses in an effort to design and test intervention strategies in the future. Eleven staff nurses, from various medical-surgical units from one hospital, participated in two separate focus groups. In this qualitative study, two major themes emerged from the data: ‘caring for the patient’ and ‘caring for one self’.  In ‘caring for oneself’, participants identified spirituality as a major component of their general well-being and ability to do their work well. Participants also valued being there for patients, ‘I think what is meaningful is to make someone’s life comfortable.’ And participants discussed the value of coworkers, ‘And having support of the manager and staff.’ Spiritual well-being was talked about as both a personal and an institutional matter: personal in that participants spoke about remembering to take time for themselves after work hours (such as massage or exercise); and institutional in that participants suggested obtaining more support from supervisors, clergy, other colleagues and social (on line) networks.  Previous research suggests that nurses practice few health promoting activities (Richards et al. 2006). This study reminds us that the spiritual well-being of nurses should be part of the health promotion efforts of the global community of nurses.en_GB
dc.subjecthealth promotionen_GB
dc.subjectself-careen_GB
dc.subjectspiritualityen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:56:26Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:56:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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