Human-Canine Interaction: Examining Stress Indicator Response Patterns of Salivary Cortisol and Immunoglobulin A

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201855
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Human-Canine Interaction: Examining Stress Indicator Response Patterns of Salivary Cortisol and Immunoglobulin A
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention)  Stress can affect human health in a variety of ways and has a direct influence on biomarkers. Stress also influences immune system function, hormones, and immunoglobulin levels. As a nurse scientist, it is necessary to investigate interventions that decrease stress and increase human health outcomes. Therefore, the purpose of this experimental study was to examine the relationships among stress indicators (as measured by stress indicators: salivary cortisol and salivary immunoglobulin A (IgA) before and after a 20 minute exposure to a certified animal assisted therapy (AAT) canine. The rights of human subjects were protected by obtaining approval from the Institutional Review Board (IRB) of Kean University prior to data collection. The participants, pet owners and non-pet owners, who agreed to participate (N = 33) were exposed to an experimental condition (canine exposure) and a control condition; over a two-week period. Salivary cortisol and IgA levels were measured by using a commercially-available saliva collection device and enzyme immunoassay (EIA) technique. Data were analyzed using SPSS software. Analysis of variance yielded a significant interaction effect of salivary cortisol in non-pet owners, Wilks’s ? = .57, F (1,16) = 11.86, p = .003. The significant result of this experiment provides a baseline for future study on using in vitro measures (biomarkers for salivary cortisol and IgA) to measure the relationships among stress indicators, pets as a coping resource, and human health outcomes.  
Keywords:
Health; Stress; Canine
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHuman-Canine Interaction: Examining Stress Indicator Response Patterns of Salivary Cortisol and Immunoglobulin Aen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201855-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention)  Stress can affect human health in a variety of ways and has a direct influence on biomarkers. Stress also influences immune system function, hormones, and immunoglobulin levels. As a nurse scientist, it is necessary to investigate interventions that decrease stress and increase human health outcomes. Therefore, the purpose of this experimental study was to examine the relationships among stress indicators (as measured by stress indicators: salivary cortisol and salivary immunoglobulin A (IgA) before and after a 20 minute exposure to a certified animal assisted therapy (AAT) canine. The rights of human subjects were protected by obtaining approval from the Institutional Review Board (IRB) of Kean University prior to data collection. The participants, pet owners and non-pet owners, who agreed to participate (N = 33) were exposed to an experimental condition (canine exposure) and a control condition; over a two-week period. Salivary cortisol and IgA levels were measured by using a commercially-available saliva collection device and enzyme immunoassay (EIA) technique. Data were analyzed using SPSS software. Analysis of variance yielded a significant interaction effect of salivary cortisol in non-pet owners, Wilks’s ? = .57, F (1,16) = 11.86, p = .003. The significant result of this experiment provides a baseline for future study on using in vitro measures (biomarkers for salivary cortisol and IgA) to measure the relationships among stress indicators, pets as a coping resource, and human health outcomes.  en_GB
dc.subjectHealthen_GB
dc.subjectStressen_GB
dc.subjectCanineen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:56:36Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:56:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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