The Influence of Nursing Patient-Centered Behaviors on African-American and Black Female Medicare Patient Satisfaction

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201860
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Influence of Nursing Patient-Centered Behaviors on African-American and Black Female Medicare Patient Satisfaction
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Desired outcomes for female African-American and Black Medicare patients requires more than technical nursing knowledge alone because providing nursing care requires interpersonal interaction with patients. This element of healthcare, called patient-centeredness, is the underlying ability of nurses that affects the quality of their interaction with patients and consequently outcomes. PURPOSES: The aims of this study were first to determine the effects of nursing patient-centeredness on female African-American and Black Medicare hospital patients’ satisfaction, likelihood to recommend, and ratings of care, and secondly, to determine if the effects were stable (invariant) across national random samples. METHODS: A two-factor multigroup structural equation modeling design was used with randomly selected national test (N1=101) and cross-validation (N2=109) samples of patients. Experiments conducted to test the model’s trustworthiness included: model goodness of fit, parameter measurement invariance, and a post hoc competing model challenge. RESULTS: The model fit. Nursing patient-centered behaviors consistently influenced female African-American and Black Medicare hospital patients’ satisfaction, likelihood to recommend, and ratings of care. Nursing patient-centeredness accounted for 71% of female African-American and Black Medicare hospital patients’ satisfaction. A standardized increase in nursing patient-centeredness concomitantly increased patients’ satisfaction, likelihood to recommend, and ratings of care by .842, .778, and .798 units respectively. The magnitude of nurses’ patient-centeredness predicted patients’ ratings. These effects were stable (invariant) across both the test and cross-validation samples of patients. When the competing model was when compared to the hypothesized model, the latter was sustained. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that nursing patient-centeredness increased female African-American and Black Medicare hospital patients’ satisfaction, likelihood to recommend, and ratings of care. The Primary Provider Theory and this study offer evidence-based models for future research with implications for the measurement and improvement of female African-American and Black Medicare hospital patients’ satisfaction, likelihood to recommend, ratings of care, nursing patient-centeredness, and disparities prevention.
Keywords:
Patient-Centeredness
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Influence of Nursing Patient-Centered Behaviors on African-American and Black Female Medicare Patient Satisfactionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201860-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Desired outcomes for female African-American and Black Medicare patients requires more than technical nursing knowledge alone because providing nursing care requires interpersonal interaction with patients. This element of healthcare, called patient-centeredness, is the underlying ability of nurses that affects the quality of their interaction with patients and consequently outcomes. PURPOSES: The aims of this study were first to determine the effects of nursing patient-centeredness on female African-American and Black Medicare hospital patients’ satisfaction, likelihood to recommend, and ratings of care, and secondly, to determine if the effects were stable (invariant) across national random samples. METHODS: A two-factor multigroup structural equation modeling design was used with randomly selected national test (N1=101) and cross-validation (N2=109) samples of patients. Experiments conducted to test the model’s trustworthiness included: model goodness of fit, parameter measurement invariance, and a post hoc competing model challenge. RESULTS: The model fit. Nursing patient-centered behaviors consistently influenced female African-American and Black Medicare hospital patients’ satisfaction, likelihood to recommend, and ratings of care. Nursing patient-centeredness accounted for 71% of female African-American and Black Medicare hospital patients’ satisfaction. A standardized increase in nursing patient-centeredness concomitantly increased patients’ satisfaction, likelihood to recommend, and ratings of care by .842, .778, and .798 units respectively. The magnitude of nurses’ patient-centeredness predicted patients’ ratings. These effects were stable (invariant) across both the test and cross-validation samples of patients. When the competing model was when compared to the hypothesized model, the latter was sustained. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that nursing patient-centeredness increased female African-American and Black Medicare hospital patients’ satisfaction, likelihood to recommend, and ratings of care. The Primary Provider Theory and this study offer evidence-based models for future research with implications for the measurement and improvement of female African-American and Black Medicare hospital patients’ satisfaction, likelihood to recommend, ratings of care, nursing patient-centeredness, and disparities prevention.en_GB
dc.subjectPatient-Centerednessen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:56:52Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:56:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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