Assessment of Decisional Involvement Among Staff and Administrative Nurses Employed in a Large Healthcare System

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201885
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Assessment of Decisional Involvement Among Staff and Administrative Nurses Employed in a Large Healthcare System
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose: Shared decision making is a necessity to ensure nurses have the opportunity to make decisions about their practice and how it impacts outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine the level of actual and preferred decisional involvement among staff and administrative nurses in a large 14 facility health care system. Methods: A convenience sample of 1402 full and part-time staff and administrative nurses completed the Decisional Involvement Scale (DIS) reflecting a response rate of 28%.  The reliable and valid instrument measures actual and preferred decisional involvement on six subscales as well as yielding a total scale score. Subjects could complete the instrument via survey monkey or paper and pencil. Results: A statistically significant difference was found between staff nurses’ actual and desired decisional involvement for all six subscales and total scale score. A statistically significance difference was found among administrative nurses desiring more decisional involvement then actually experienced in the work environment. Additionally, statistically significant differences were found between staff nurses and administrative nurses decisional involvement scale scores allowing some assessment of concordance between the two groups. Conclusion: Staff and administrative nurses desired more decisional involvement regarding their practice environment which provides support for strengthening shared governance efforts across the health care system.
Keywords:
shared governance; decisional involvement; work environment
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssessment of Decisional Involvement Among Staff and Administrative Nurses Employed in a Large Healthcare Systemen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201885-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose: Shared decision making is a necessity to ensure nurses have the opportunity to make decisions about their practice and how it impacts outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine the level of actual and preferred decisional involvement among staff and administrative nurses in a large 14 facility health care system. Methods: A convenience sample of 1402 full and part-time staff and administrative nurses completed the Decisional Involvement Scale (DIS) reflecting a response rate of 28%.  The reliable and valid instrument measures actual and preferred decisional involvement on six subscales as well as yielding a total scale score. Subjects could complete the instrument via survey monkey or paper and pencil. Results: A statistically significant difference was found between staff nurses’ actual and desired decisional involvement for all six subscales and total scale score. A statistically significance difference was found among administrative nurses desiring more decisional involvement then actually experienced in the work environment. Additionally, statistically significant differences were found between staff nurses and administrative nurses decisional involvement scale scores allowing some assessment of concordance between the two groups. Conclusion: Staff and administrative nurses desired more decisional involvement regarding their practice environment which provides support for strengthening shared governance efforts across the health care system.en_GB
dc.subjectshared governanceen_GB
dc.subjectdecisional involvementen_GB
dc.subjectwork environmenten_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:58:13Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:58:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.