Impact of Workplace Incivility on Staff Nurses including Productivity and Financial Consequences

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201887
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of Workplace Incivility on Staff Nurses including Productivity and Financial Consequences
Author(s):
Patricia S. Lewis; Ann T. Malecha PhD, RN
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Background Workplace Incivility is “low-intensity deviant behavior with ambiguous intent to harm the target, in violation of workplace norms for mutual respect.” (Andersson & Pearson, 1999, p. 452). Healthy work environments are linked to patient safety and positive outcomes.   Purpose/Aims The aims of the study were to determine relationships and predictors of individual and organizational factors influencing workplace incivility as well as its impact on productivity and costs.   Methods This non-experimental study of 659 staff nurses was conducted in 2009. This study is based on the Conceptual Model of Workplace Incivility (Pearson et al., 2005). IRB approval was obtained. The instruments were: Nursing Incivility Scale (Guidroz, 2007), Work Limitation Questionnaire (1998), and a demographic component.   Results Experience with workplace incivility in the last year 85% (n = 553). • Previous experience with workplace incivility was associated with higher incivility scores (p < 0.001). • Managers who handle workplace incivility predicted less incivility on the unit (p < 0.001). There was a negative relationship between the staff nurses' perception of their Manager's ability to handle workplace incivility in all subscales except patient/visitor. • The OR setting had greater workplace incivility than the ICU and Med/Surg (p<0.001). • Staff nurses working in healthy work environments, defined as Magnet, Pathway to Excellence and/or Beacon Unit recognition, reported lower WPI scores compared to nurses working in the standard work environment (p < 0.01). • There was a negative relationship between workplace incivility and productivity. Lost productivity was calculated at $11,581/nurse/year.   Conclusions Hospitals can not afford the people and financial impact of workplace incivility. The influence on nurses and patient safety can not be discounted. Further research is needed. Civility matters!
Keywords:
work environment; productivity; Workplace incivility
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of Workplace Incivility on Staff Nurses including Productivity and Financial Consequencesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPatricia S. Lewisen
dc.contributor.authorAnn T. Malecha PhD, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201887-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Background Workplace Incivility is “low-intensity deviant behavior with ambiguous intent to harm the target, in violation of workplace norms for mutual respect.” (Andersson & Pearson, 1999, p. 452). Healthy work environments are linked to patient safety and positive outcomes.   Purpose/Aims The aims of the study were to determine relationships and predictors of individual and organizational factors influencing workplace incivility as well as its impact on productivity and costs.   Methods This non-experimental study of 659 staff nurses was conducted in 2009. This study is based on the Conceptual Model of Workplace Incivility (Pearson et al., 2005). IRB approval was obtained. The instruments were: Nursing Incivility Scale (Guidroz, 2007), Work Limitation Questionnaire (1998), and a demographic component.   Results Experience with workplace incivility in the last year 85% (n = 553). • Previous experience with workplace incivility was associated with higher incivility scores (p < 0.001). • Managers who handle workplace incivility predicted less incivility on the unit (p < 0.001). There was a negative relationship between the staff nurses' perception of their Manager's ability to handle workplace incivility in all subscales except patient/visitor. • The OR setting had greater workplace incivility than the ICU and Med/Surg (p<0.001). • Staff nurses working in healthy work environments, defined as Magnet, Pathway to Excellence and/or Beacon Unit recognition, reported lower WPI scores compared to nurses working in the standard work environment (p < 0.01). • There was a negative relationship between workplace incivility and productivity. Lost productivity was calculated at $11,581/nurse/year.   Conclusions Hospitals can not afford the people and financial impact of workplace incivility. The influence on nurses and patient safety can not be discounted. Further research is needed. Civility matters!en_GB
dc.subjectwork environmenten_GB
dc.subjectproductivityen_GB
dc.subjectWorkplace incivilityen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:58:19Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:58:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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