2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201896
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Student Perspectives on Classroom Participation
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Student Perspectives on Classroom Participation             Encouraging students to participate during class is an essential step in facilitating learning and encouraging critical thinking. However, students remain reluctant to participate in classroom discussion for a variety of reasons. This study provides insight into students’ perspective on classroom participation and recommendations to increase levels of student participation based on these insights (Loftin, Davis & Hartin, 2010).             In this exploratory content analysis study, nursing students were asked what encourages them to participate in the classroom including asking questions, answering questions, or making comments. Credibility was addressed by the interviewer restating some responses and asking the participants to confirm the researcher’s understanding of the response, a form of member checking. Methodological rigor was ensured by maintaining an audit trail and prolonged engagement.             Four themes emerged, including faculty influences, other student influences, environmental influences, and intrapersonal influences. The data reflect the participants’ experiences regarding classroom participation (Loftin et al., 2010).             Findings identified the need for creation of an environment of safety in which students will risk asking questions or making comments that will deter feelings of inadequacy or retribution. The evidence suggests a difference in traditional vs. non-traditional students, environmental activity, student appearance, and configuration and size of the classroom all affect student participation (Loftin et al., 2010).             Thoughtful planning of structured classroom activities and discussion to increase participation can augment other modes of learning such as small group work and class lectures. Providing an environment to enhance active learning and critical thinking skills can be accomplished by innovative nurse educators through techniques that encourage every student to actively participate in the classroom (Loftin et al., 2010). Reference Loftin, C., Davis, L.A. & Hartin, V. (2010). Classroom participation: A student perspective. Teaching and Learning in Nursing 5, 119-124.
Keywords:
classroom participation; student engagement
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStudent Perspectives on Classroom Participationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201896-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Student Perspectives on Classroom Participation             Encouraging students to participate during class is an essential step in facilitating learning and encouraging critical thinking. However, students remain reluctant to participate in classroom discussion for a variety of reasons. This study provides insight into students’ perspective on classroom participation and recommendations to increase levels of student participation based on these insights (Loftin, Davis & Hartin, 2010).             In this exploratory content analysis study, nursing students were asked what encourages them to participate in the classroom including asking questions, answering questions, or making comments. Credibility was addressed by the interviewer restating some responses and asking the participants to confirm the researcher’s understanding of the response, a form of member checking. Methodological rigor was ensured by maintaining an audit trail and prolonged engagement.             Four themes emerged, including faculty influences, other student influences, environmental influences, and intrapersonal influences. The data reflect the participants’ experiences regarding classroom participation (Loftin et al., 2010).             Findings identified the need for creation of an environment of safety in which students will risk asking questions or making comments that will deter feelings of inadequacy or retribution. The evidence suggests a difference in traditional vs. non-traditional students, environmental activity, student appearance, and configuration and size of the classroom all affect student participation (Loftin et al., 2010).             Thoughtful planning of structured classroom activities and discussion to increase participation can augment other modes of learning such as small group work and class lectures. Providing an environment to enhance active learning and critical thinking skills can be accomplished by innovative nurse educators through techniques that encourage every student to actively participate in the classroom (Loftin et al., 2010). Reference Loftin, C., Davis, L.A. & Hartin, V. (2010). Classroom participation: A student perspective. Teaching and Learning in Nursing 5, 119-124.en_GB
dc.subjectclassroom participationen_GB
dc.subjectstudent engagementen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:58:49Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:58:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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