How Can Babies Sleep?: A Question of Environmental Noise Expressed as Decibel Levels in an Urban Level Three NICU

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201899
Type:
Presentation
Title:
How Can Babies Sleep?: A Question of Environmental Noise Expressed as Decibel Levels in an Urban Level Three NICU
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Background: Noise is part of our environment but when it reaches high decibel (dB) levels it can have adverse effects (Darcy, Hancock, & Ware, 2008). High decibel levels create stress responses and poor outcomes for hospitalized infants (Etzel, & Balk, 1999). The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) established criteria for noise in the NICU (White, 2007), which include baseline, hourly, and transient noise levels.  Unfortunately studies show that high decibel noise levels remain in hospitals and critical care settings, including neonatal intensive care units (NICU) (Lasky, & Williams, 2009; Darcy, & Hancock, 2008; McLaren, & Maxwell-Armstrong, 2008).  Aims:  1) Describe the current baseline decibel levels of noise in the NICU; 2) Identify variables responsible for noise decibel levels; 3) Evaluate staff/parent perceptions of noise;  4) Identify variables responsible for noise decibel level variability in the NICU. Methods: Design:  Descriptive exploratory study. Setting: Urban, 45 bed, level three NICU. Procedures: Data collected for two months.  Noise measured by obtaining decibel readings using the Quest Model 2900 sound meter.  Readings taken for15 minutes at 4 hourly intervals.  Noise levels recorded as low, peak and average.  To ascertain perception of noise, surveys conducted with NICU personnel and parents of infants in the NICU.  Results:  Readings taken on 19 days in different areas of the NICU.  Low dB readings ranged from 53 - 66 dB.  High dB readings ranged from 60 -80.  Overall average readings ranged from 57.2 -70.2 dB.  Fifty-three surveys returned and indicate parents and nurses most bothered by babies crying and staff talking while respiratory therapists are most bothered by alarms. Implications for Nursing: Noise levels in the NICU typically exceed the recommended criteria.  Both parents and staff are bothered by the excess noise.  Results from further analyses will help guide targeted quality improvement strategies to minimize noise decibel levels.   
Keywords:
sound; neonatal intensive care unit; noise
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHow Can Babies Sleep?: A Question of Environmental Noise Expressed as Decibel Levels in an Urban Level Three NICUen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201899-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Background: Noise is part of our environment but when it reaches high decibel (dB) levels it can have adverse effects (Darcy, Hancock, & Ware, 2008). High decibel levels create stress responses and poor outcomes for hospitalized infants (Etzel, & Balk, 1999). The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) established criteria for noise in the NICU (White, 2007), which include baseline, hourly, and transient noise levels.  Unfortunately studies show that high decibel noise levels remain in hospitals and critical care settings, including neonatal intensive care units (NICU) (Lasky, & Williams, 2009; Darcy, & Hancock, 2008; McLaren, & Maxwell-Armstrong, 2008).  Aims:  1) Describe the current baseline decibel levels of noise in the NICU; 2) Identify variables responsible for noise decibel levels; 3) Evaluate staff/parent perceptions of noise;  4) Identify variables responsible for noise decibel level variability in the NICU. Methods: Design:  Descriptive exploratory study. Setting: Urban, 45 bed, level three NICU. Procedures: Data collected for two months.  Noise measured by obtaining decibel readings using the Quest Model 2900 sound meter.  Readings taken for15 minutes at 4 hourly intervals.  Noise levels recorded as low, peak and average.  To ascertain perception of noise, surveys conducted with NICU personnel and parents of infants in the NICU.  Results:  Readings taken on 19 days in different areas of the NICU.  Low dB readings ranged from 53 - 66 dB.  High dB readings ranged from 60 -80.  Overall average readings ranged from 57.2 -70.2 dB.  Fifty-three surveys returned and indicate parents and nurses most bothered by babies crying and staff talking while respiratory therapists are most bothered by alarms. Implications for Nursing: Noise levels in the NICU typically exceed the recommended criteria.  Both parents and staff are bothered by the excess noise.  Results from further analyses will help guide targeted quality improvement strategies to minimize noise decibel levels.   en_GB
dc.subjectsounden_GB
dc.subjectneonatal intensive care uniten_GB
dc.subjectnoiseen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:58:59Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:58:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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