A Study on Factors that Affect the Febrile Response in Patients with Healthcare-Associated Bloodstream Infection

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201903
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Study on Factors that Affect the Febrile Response in Patients with Healthcare-Associated Bloodstream Infection
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Background Fever is considered a hallmark sign of infection; however, the reasons why some patients suffer from infection without manifesting a febrile response were not fully explored. Purpose The aims of this study were to examine factors that affect body temperature of febrile response in patients with healthcare-associated bloodstream infection (BSI). Method This was a retrospective cohort study using medical records as the primary source of research data. Six hundred subjects with healthcare-associated BSI were identified from the infection control data bank of a medical center as an accessible population. Two indicators were used to measure changes in body temperature: temperature at the onset, and magnitude of fever during the period of infection. Results The sample consisted of 230 patients (134 males and 96 females) between the ages of 19 and 94. The mean baseline temperature was 36.33°C with no age difference. The mean temperature at the onset of infection was 38.33°C. Multiple regression analysis revealed white blood cell (WBC) count, severity of co-morbidity, body weight, and microbial classification were significant predictors of temperature at the onset of infection. However, these factors predicted only 7.4% of the variance of onset temperature. General Estimating Equation analysis demonstrated WBC count, age, severity of co-morbidity, physical function and microbial classification were significant predictors of the magnitude of fever. Conclusions This study revealed that WBC count, severity of co-morbidity, and microbial classification have effects both on onset temperature and magnitude of temperature change during the period of infection. The finding indicates febrile response is a complex biophysical adaption with multiple determinants. It also provided a base for future prospective studies of the biophysical factors related to fever responses.
Keywords:
healthcare-associated bloodstream infection; febrile response; body temperature
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Study on Factors that Affect the Febrile Response in Patients with Healthcare-Associated Bloodstream Infectionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201903-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Background Fever is considered a hallmark sign of infection; however, the reasons why some patients suffer from infection without manifesting a febrile response were not fully explored. Purpose The aims of this study were to examine factors that affect body temperature of febrile response in patients with healthcare-associated bloodstream infection (BSI). Method This was a retrospective cohort study using medical records as the primary source of research data. Six hundred subjects with healthcare-associated BSI were identified from the infection control data bank of a medical center as an accessible population. Two indicators were used to measure changes in body temperature: temperature at the onset, and magnitude of fever during the period of infection. Results The sample consisted of 230 patients (134 males and 96 females) between the ages of 19 and 94. The mean baseline temperature was 36.33°C with no age difference. The mean temperature at the onset of infection was 38.33°C. Multiple regression analysis revealed white blood cell (WBC) count, severity of co-morbidity, body weight, and microbial classification were significant predictors of temperature at the onset of infection. However, these factors predicted only 7.4% of the variance of onset temperature. General Estimating Equation analysis demonstrated WBC count, age, severity of co-morbidity, physical function and microbial classification were significant predictors of the magnitude of fever. Conclusions This study revealed that WBC count, severity of co-morbidity, and microbial classification have effects both on onset temperature and magnitude of temperature change during the period of infection. The finding indicates febrile response is a complex biophysical adaption with multiple determinants. It also provided a base for future prospective studies of the biophysical factors related to fever responses.en_GB
dc.subjecthealthcare-associated bloodstream infectionen_GB
dc.subjectfebrile responseen_GB
dc.subjectbody temperatureen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:59:12Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:59:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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