Acculturation of Mexican-Americans and Parental Use of Over-the-Counter Cough and Cold Medicines

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201906
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Acculturation of Mexican-Americans and Parental Use of Over-the-Counter Cough and Cold Medicines
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose: The purpose of this clinical inquiry project is to evaluate current parental knowledge about use of cough and cold medicine in children among Mexican American parents and to determine if parental knowledge and levels of acculturation relate to parental use of over-the-counter (OTC) cough and cold medicines.  Few research studies are available regarding parents who are not fluent in English and their use of OTC medications for their children. Methods: 95 parental participants completed two anonymous surveys to assess their level of knowledge, behavior, and uses of over the counter cough and cold medicine. A convenience sample was used to test the hypotheses for this clinical inquiry project.  The criterion used for significance (alpha) is designated at .05.  The study has a power of 81.0% and the effect size selected was .30. Results: Analysis of results indicated a small, positive correlation between parental knowledge and behavior, indicating higher parental knowledge scores were associated with efficacious uses of OTC cough and cold medicine.  Parents’ levels of acculturation and knowledge also demonstrated a small positive relationship, indicating higher levels of parental acculturation to the United States were associated with higher levels of parents’ knowledge about OTC cough and cold medicines.  Parents’ levels of acculturation did not demonstrate a significant correlation to parental uses of these medicines.  Conclusion: Results from this clinical inquiry project will enable clinicians to develop practices that foster healthy parental practices regarding treatment of childhood colds.  This novel project will be essential for primary care providers to develop practices that foster healthy parental practices regarding medication use for their children. The potential to improve culturally competent care for one the largest growing ethnic groups in this nation is essential providing health care to this population.
Keywords:
Parental knowledge; Parental acculturation; Parent behavior
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAcculturation of Mexican-Americans and Parental Use of Over-the-Counter Cough and Cold Medicinesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201906-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose: The purpose of this clinical inquiry project is to evaluate current parental knowledge about use of cough and cold medicine in children among Mexican American parents and to determine if parental knowledge and levels of acculturation relate to parental use of over-the-counter (OTC) cough and cold medicines.  Few research studies are available regarding parents who are not fluent in English and their use of OTC medications for their children. Methods: 95 parental participants completed two anonymous surveys to assess their level of knowledge, behavior, and uses of over the counter cough and cold medicine. A convenience sample was used to test the hypotheses for this clinical inquiry project.  The criterion used for significance (alpha) is designated at .05.  The study has a power of 81.0% and the effect size selected was .30. Results: Analysis of results indicated a small, positive correlation between parental knowledge and behavior, indicating higher parental knowledge scores were associated with efficacious uses of OTC cough and cold medicine.  Parents’ levels of acculturation and knowledge also demonstrated a small positive relationship, indicating higher levels of parental acculturation to the United States were associated with higher levels of parents’ knowledge about OTC cough and cold medicines.  Parents’ levels of acculturation did not demonstrate a significant correlation to parental uses of these medicines.  Conclusion: Results from this clinical inquiry project will enable clinicians to develop practices that foster healthy parental practices regarding treatment of childhood colds.  This novel project will be essential for primary care providers to develop practices that foster healthy parental practices regarding medication use for their children. The potential to improve culturally competent care for one the largest growing ethnic groups in this nation is essential providing health care to this population.en_GB
dc.subjectParental knowledgeen_GB
dc.subjectParental acculturationen_GB
dc.subjectParent behavioren_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:59:21Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:59:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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