Job Dissatisfaction and Burnout and the Association with Nurse Characteristics Among Nurses in China

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201909
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Job Dissatisfaction and Burnout and the Association with Nurse Characteristics Among Nurses in China
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Objective: Nurse job dissatisfaction and burnout are associated with nursing quality of care and patient outcomes. However, it is unclear on nurses’ experience of job dissatisfaction and burnout in China. This study aimed to describe nurse job dissatisfaction and burnout among nurses in China; and to explore their association with nurse characteristics. Design and Methods: This study is a secondary data analysis of data from a 2008-2009 survey of registered nurses in general hospitals in China. Job dissatisfaction and burnout were measured by job dissatisfaction scale and the Maslach Burnout Inventory respectively. Nurse characteristics included gender, employment type, education background, work experience, and working unit. Robust logistic regression was used to exam the association between job dissatisfaction/burnout and nurse characteristics. Findings: Our final sample included 8,709 nurses working in 180 hospitals in China. The average number of nurse respondents per hospital was 48. We found 46% of the nurses expressed dissatisfaction with their current job and 38% reported high burnout. From logistic regression model, we found employment type significantly affected both job dissatisfaction (OR=1.33, 95% CI: 1.17-1.51) and burnout (OR=1.30, 95% CI: 1.15-1.48) when controlling other nurse characteristics; similarly, working unit (surgical VS. medical) had significant effects on job dissatisfaction (OR=0.81, 95% CI: 0.70-0.92) and burnout (OR=0.85, 95% CI: 0.73-0.98).  We also found nurse job dissatisfaction was significantly influenced by nursing education (OR=1.40, 95% CI: 1.17-1.68) and nurse work experience (OR=1.01, 95% CI: 1.00-1.02). Conclusion: Large proportion of nurses in China expressed dissatisfaction with their job and experienced high burnout. Chinese nurses’ perception of job dissatisfaction and burnout were affected by employment type, working unit, education background, and work experience. Clinical Relevance: Chinese policy makers and administrators of health institutes should put a focus on reducing nurse job dissatisfaction and burnout in the process of improving quality of care.
Keywords:
job dissatisfaction; nurse in China; burnout
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleJob Dissatisfaction and Burnout and the Association with Nurse Characteristics Among Nurses in Chinaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201909-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Objective: Nurse job dissatisfaction and burnout are associated with nursing quality of care and patient outcomes. However, it is unclear on nurses’ experience of job dissatisfaction and burnout in China. This study aimed to describe nurse job dissatisfaction and burnout among nurses in China; and to explore their association with nurse characteristics. Design and Methods: This study is a secondary data analysis of data from a 2008-2009 survey of registered nurses in general hospitals in China. Job dissatisfaction and burnout were measured by job dissatisfaction scale and the Maslach Burnout Inventory respectively. Nurse characteristics included gender, employment type, education background, work experience, and working unit. Robust logistic regression was used to exam the association between job dissatisfaction/burnout and nurse characteristics. Findings: Our final sample included 8,709 nurses working in 180 hospitals in China. The average number of nurse respondents per hospital was 48. We found 46% of the nurses expressed dissatisfaction with their current job and 38% reported high burnout. From logistic regression model, we found employment type significantly affected both job dissatisfaction (OR=1.33, 95% CI: 1.17-1.51) and burnout (OR=1.30, 95% CI: 1.15-1.48) when controlling other nurse characteristics; similarly, working unit (surgical VS. medical) had significant effects on job dissatisfaction (OR=0.81, 95% CI: 0.70-0.92) and burnout (OR=0.85, 95% CI: 0.73-0.98).  We also found nurse job dissatisfaction was significantly influenced by nursing education (OR=1.40, 95% CI: 1.17-1.68) and nurse work experience (OR=1.01, 95% CI: 1.00-1.02). Conclusion: Large proportion of nurses in China expressed dissatisfaction with their job and experienced high burnout. Chinese nurses’ perception of job dissatisfaction and burnout were affected by employment type, working unit, education background, and work experience. Clinical Relevance: Chinese policy makers and administrators of health institutes should put a focus on reducing nurse job dissatisfaction and burnout in the process of improving quality of care.en_GB
dc.subjectjob dissatisfactionen_GB
dc.subjectnurse in Chinaen_GB
dc.subjectburnouten_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:59:30Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:59:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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