Testing an Occupation-Based Cultural Heritage Intervention to Facilitate Adaptation of Newly Admitted African-American and Caucasian Residents to Long-Term Care: Evidence-Based Research

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201912
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Testing an Occupation-Based Cultural Heritage Intervention to Facilitate Adaptation of Newly Admitted African-American and Caucasian Residents to Long-Term Care: Evidence-Based Research
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) As the need for long-term (LTC) care increases, with the steady growth of older adults globally, relocation to LTC settings is expected to grow. Transition to the unfamiliar becomes a significant life event. This presentation will report findings from an NINR funded collaborative research study between occupational therapy and nursing faculty that investigated the effectiveness of an Occupation-Based Cultural Heritage Intervention (OBCHI) to improve adaptation to LTC relocation.  Aims of the two-year study were to:  1) identify personal and cultural factors of elders that facilitate adaptation to LTC settings; 2) develop an occupation-based cultural heritage intervention; and 3) test the effectiveness of the intervention on the adaptation of Caucasian and African-American elders to LTC. A quasi-experimental nonequivalent control group design with pre- and post- tests was conducted in skilled nursing facilities. Inclusion criteria included age 55 or older, admitted to skilled nursing care 12 months or less, and cognitively intact. Discussion will focus on development and effect of a Cultural Heritage Intervention on quality of life, activity engagement, and social participation of nursing home residents. Findings have relevance to evidence-based nursing practice and cultural care in LTCs settings globally. References: Brandburg, G. L. (2007). Making the transition to nursing home life. Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 33(6), 50-56. Coughlan, R. & Ward, L. (2007). Experiences of recently relocated residents of a long-term care facility in Ontario: Assessing quality qualitatively. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 44(1), 47-57. Ferrans, C. E. & Powers, M. J. (1992). Psychometric assessment of the Quality of Life Index. Research in Nursing Health, 15(1), 29-38. Heliker, D. & Scholler-Jaquish, A. (2006). Transition of new residents. Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 32(9), 34-42. Hutchinson, S., Hersch, G., Davidson, H., Mastel-Smith, B., & Chu, A. (in press). Voices of elders: Culture and person factors.
Keywords:
Culture; Quality of life; Long-term care
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTesting an Occupation-Based Cultural Heritage Intervention to Facilitate Adaptation of Newly Admitted African-American and Caucasian Residents to Long-Term Care: Evidence-Based Researchen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201912-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) As the need for long-term (LTC) care increases, with the steady growth of older adults globally, relocation to LTC settings is expected to grow. Transition to the unfamiliar becomes a significant life event. This presentation will report findings from an NINR funded collaborative research study between occupational therapy and nursing faculty that investigated the effectiveness of an Occupation-Based Cultural Heritage Intervention (OBCHI) to improve adaptation to LTC relocation.  Aims of the two-year study were to:  1) identify personal and cultural factors of elders that facilitate adaptation to LTC settings; 2) develop an occupation-based cultural heritage intervention; and 3) test the effectiveness of the intervention on the adaptation of Caucasian and African-American elders to LTC. A quasi-experimental nonequivalent control group design with pre- and post- tests was conducted in skilled nursing facilities. Inclusion criteria included age 55 or older, admitted to skilled nursing care 12 months or less, and cognitively intact. Discussion will focus on development and effect of a Cultural Heritage Intervention on quality of life, activity engagement, and social participation of nursing home residents. Findings have relevance to evidence-based nursing practice and cultural care in LTCs settings globally. References: Brandburg, G. L. (2007). Making the transition to nursing home life. Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 33(6), 50-56. Coughlan, R. & Ward, L. (2007). Experiences of recently relocated residents of a long-term care facility in Ontario: Assessing quality qualitatively. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 44(1), 47-57. Ferrans, C. E. & Powers, M. J. (1992). Psychometric assessment of the Quality of Life Index. Research in Nursing Health, 15(1), 29-38. Heliker, D. & Scholler-Jaquish, A. (2006). Transition of new residents. Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 32(9), 34-42. Hutchinson, S., Hersch, G., Davidson, H., Mastel-Smith, B., & Chu, A. (in press). Voices of elders: Culture and person factors.en_GB
dc.subjectCultureen_GB
dc.subjectQuality of lifeen_GB
dc.subjectLong-term careen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:59:40Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:59:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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