Student and Registered Nursing Staff's Perceptions of 12-Hour Clinical Rotations in an Undergraduate Baccalaureate Nursing Program

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201914
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Student and Registered Nursing Staff's Perceptions of 12-Hour Clinical Rotations in an Undergraduate Baccalaureate Nursing Program
Author(s):
Bette A. Mariani; Angelina Arcamone PhD, RN, CCE; Jennifer Cummins MSN, RN, CEN, BC
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) With today’s increase in student enrollment in baccalaureate nursing education, it is more challenging to secure quality clinical placements with optimal learning experiences. Some clinical agencies can only offer 12-hour clinical shift rotations for students. Few studies have been conducted on the use of 12-hour clinical shift rotations with nursing students, with little evidence supporting this clinical scheduling strategy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the students’ and registered nursing staff’s perceptions of whether the 12-hour clinical shift rotation for nursing students enhances their clinical learning ability, allows for better continuity of care for their assigned patients and families, and facilitates their ability to correlate theory to nursing practice.  This nursing program placed junior level students in 12-hour clinical shifts. A mixed-method design was used to conduct the study. The nursing students (N = 28) and staff nurses (N = 8) who participated in the 12-hour clinical rotations were asked to complete a Likert-scale questionnaire, as well as open-ended questions. Focus groups were conducted with the nursing students (N = 3 groups). The student questionnaire included items such as, continuity of care, collaboration, ability to correlate theory to practice, and enhanced learning; the mean scores ranged from 4.04 to 4.86 (1 = strongly disagree and 5 = strongly agree). The staff nurse questionnaire included similar items; the mean scores were 4.63 to 5. Themes identified from the focus groups and open-ended questions from the nursing students were continuity of care, enhanced learning, communication, and collaboration. Themes that emerged from the open-ended questions for the nurses were continuity of care and enhanced time for teaching. Overall, the response from nursing students and nurses was positive regarding 12-hour clinical shift rotations for students, and provides evidence that can support 12-hour clinical rotations as a strategy for clinical education.
Keywords:
Student; Clinical Rotations; 12-hour shift
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStudent and Registered Nursing Staff's Perceptions of 12-Hour Clinical Rotations in an Undergraduate Baccalaureate Nursing Programen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBette A. Marianien
dc.contributor.authorAngelina Arcamone PhD, RN, CCEen
dc.contributor.authorJennifer Cummins MSN, RN, CEN, BCen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201914-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) With today’s increase in student enrollment in baccalaureate nursing education, it is more challenging to secure quality clinical placements with optimal learning experiences. Some clinical agencies can only offer 12-hour clinical shift rotations for students. Few studies have been conducted on the use of 12-hour clinical shift rotations with nursing students, with little evidence supporting this clinical scheduling strategy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the students’ and registered nursing staff’s perceptions of whether the 12-hour clinical shift rotation for nursing students enhances their clinical learning ability, allows for better continuity of care for their assigned patients and families, and facilitates their ability to correlate theory to nursing practice.  This nursing program placed junior level students in 12-hour clinical shifts. A mixed-method design was used to conduct the study. The nursing students (N = 28) and staff nurses (N = 8) who participated in the 12-hour clinical rotations were asked to complete a Likert-scale questionnaire, as well as open-ended questions. Focus groups were conducted with the nursing students (N = 3 groups). The student questionnaire included items such as, continuity of care, collaboration, ability to correlate theory to practice, and enhanced learning; the mean scores ranged from 4.04 to 4.86 (1 = strongly disagree and 5 = strongly agree). The staff nurse questionnaire included similar items; the mean scores were 4.63 to 5. Themes identified from the focus groups and open-ended questions from the nursing students were continuity of care, enhanced learning, communication, and collaboration. Themes that emerged from the open-ended questions for the nurses were continuity of care and enhanced time for teaching. Overall, the response from nursing students and nurses was positive regarding 12-hour clinical shift rotations for students, and provides evidence that can support 12-hour clinical rotations as a strategy for clinical education.en_GB
dc.subjectStudenten_GB
dc.subjectClinical Rotationsen_GB
dc.subject12-hour shiften_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T10:59:47Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T10:59:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.