Home at Last: U.S. Military Nurses Transition to Civilian Practice

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201920
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Home at Last: U.S. Military Nurses Transition to Civilian Practice
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose:  The aim of this pilot study was to understand the experience of transition for military nurses who have reintegrated to civilian nursing practice from military nursing practice. Rationale: It is this enlightenment and appreciation of the military nurses’ transition that will enable civilian nurses to support reintegration with a helping and caring hand. The current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan include military nurses who may also be redeployed to combat zones. With knowledge and understanding of their wartime experience, civilian nurses can support our colleagues as they transition and reintegrate into civilian nursing practice in a caring, collaborative and helpful manner. Methodology: Colaizzi’s (1978) descriptive phenomenology was the qualitative research method chosen to understand and describe military nurses’ experience of transitioning from military practice to civilian practice. Sample: A purposive sample was used consisting of three female military nurses’ who met the sample criteria of being 20 years of age or older and having served as a military nurse who has returned to civilian nursing practice. There was no exclusion based on branch of service, length of service or specific war. The small sample size was sufficient for a pilot study. Findings:  There were five themes that emerged from thematic analysis: 1) A different way of thinking, 2) Role clarity to role confusion, 3) A questionable welcome, 4) Loss of independence and authority and 5) Lack of cohesiveness. Recommendations for future research: There are distinct differences in the culture of military nursing and civilian nursing that military nurses' understand and appreciate however less so for civilian nurses. Future research on this transition will emphasize the importance for nurses globally to appreciate and understand the variances between these two types of nursing. This awareness will help nursing to better employ the contributions that our military nurses bring to the workforce.
Keywords:
military nurses; transitions; phenomenology
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHome at Last: U.S. Military Nurses Transition to Civilian Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201920-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose:  The aim of this pilot study was to understand the experience of transition for military nurses who have reintegrated to civilian nursing practice from military nursing practice. Rationale: It is this enlightenment and appreciation of the military nurses’ transition that will enable civilian nurses to support reintegration with a helping and caring hand. The current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan include military nurses who may also be redeployed to combat zones. With knowledge and understanding of their wartime experience, civilian nurses can support our colleagues as they transition and reintegrate into civilian nursing practice in a caring, collaborative and helpful manner. Methodology: Colaizzi’s (1978) descriptive phenomenology was the qualitative research method chosen to understand and describe military nurses’ experience of transitioning from military practice to civilian practice. Sample: A purposive sample was used consisting of three female military nurses’ who met the sample criteria of being 20 years of age or older and having served as a military nurse who has returned to civilian nursing practice. There was no exclusion based on branch of service, length of service or specific war. The small sample size was sufficient for a pilot study. Findings:  There were five themes that emerged from thematic analysis: 1) A different way of thinking, 2) Role clarity to role confusion, 3) A questionable welcome, 4) Loss of independence and authority and 5) Lack of cohesiveness. Recommendations for future research: There are distinct differences in the culture of military nursing and civilian nursing that military nurses' understand and appreciate however less so for civilian nurses. Future research on this transition will emphasize the importance for nurses globally to appreciate and understand the variances between these two types of nursing. This awareness will help nursing to better employ the contributions that our military nurses bring to the workforce.en_GB
dc.subjectmilitary nursesen_GB
dc.subjecttransitionsen_GB
dc.subjectphenomenologyen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:00:07Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:00:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.