Enhancing Motivation for Physical Activity to Reduce Falls: A Theory Based Intervention

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201944
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Enhancing Motivation for Physical Activity to Reduce Falls: A Theory Based Intervention
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Background and Significance: The growing number of falls and related injuries among older adults continues to be a major public health concern. Physical activity is a proven preventive strategy, yet the majority of older adults have sedentary lifestyles and the rate of falls continues to increase. Research suggests that motivational factors influence the adoption and maintenance of fall-preventive physical activity, yet few interventions have focused on motivational factors. Developing theory-based interventions designed to prevent falls in older adults can contribute meaningfully to stemming the personal and financial costs of falls. Methods: The wellness motivation theory (WMT) guided the development of the wellness motivation intervention (WMI), based on theoretical program elements: problem definition, critical inputs, mediating processes, expected outcomes, exogenous outcomes, and implementation issues. Results: The WMI addresses the problem increased risk for falls and related injury among adults above the age of 74 due to decreased motivation for participation in physical activities that build leg strength and balance. Social network support, empowering education, and motivational support are WMI critical inputs that operationalize the key constructs in the WMT. Mediating processes of the WMI include contextual factors and behavioral change processes. The intended outcome of the WMI in this program is to reduce fall risk indicated as increased physical activity behaviors and improved leg strength and balance. Exogenous factors, contextual variables that will influence intervention delivery or outcomes, include: (a) individual biological factors that affect fall risk, function, and comfort; (b) prior experiences with physical activity and motivational interventions; and (c) setting characteristics. Attention to potential implementation issues such as fidelity, dose, and strength will also minimize error. Conclusions: The WMI focuses on mechanisms that link motivational resources to fall-preventive physical activity, fostering social contextual and other resources to facilitate the behavioral change process.
Keywords:
Physical Activity; Older Adults; Falls
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEnhancing Motivation for Physical Activity to Reduce Falls: A Theory Based Interventionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201944-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Background and Significance: The growing number of falls and related injuries among older adults continues to be a major public health concern. Physical activity is a proven preventive strategy, yet the majority of older adults have sedentary lifestyles and the rate of falls continues to increase. Research suggests that motivational factors influence the adoption and maintenance of fall-preventive physical activity, yet few interventions have focused on motivational factors. Developing theory-based interventions designed to prevent falls in older adults can contribute meaningfully to stemming the personal and financial costs of falls. Methods: The wellness motivation theory (WMT) guided the development of the wellness motivation intervention (WMI), based on theoretical program elements: problem definition, critical inputs, mediating processes, expected outcomes, exogenous outcomes, and implementation issues. Results: The WMI addresses the problem increased risk for falls and related injury among adults above the age of 74 due to decreased motivation for participation in physical activities that build leg strength and balance. Social network support, empowering education, and motivational support are WMI critical inputs that operationalize the key constructs in the WMT. Mediating processes of the WMI include contextual factors and behavioral change processes. The intended outcome of the WMI in this program is to reduce fall risk indicated as increased physical activity behaviors and improved leg strength and balance. Exogenous factors, contextual variables that will influence intervention delivery or outcomes, include: (a) individual biological factors that affect fall risk, function, and comfort; (b) prior experiences with physical activity and motivational interventions; and (c) setting characteristics. Attention to potential implementation issues such as fidelity, dose, and strength will also minimize error. Conclusions: The WMI focuses on mechanisms that link motivational resources to fall-preventive physical activity, fostering social contextual and other resources to facilitate the behavioral change process.en_GB
dc.subjectPhysical Activityen_GB
dc.subjectOlder Adultsen_GB
dc.subjectFallsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:01:30Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:01:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.