Illness Representations of Chronic Kidney Disease: Preliminary Findings

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201945
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Illness Representations of Chronic Kidney Disease: Preliminary Findings
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Objective Describe illness and treatment beliefs of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Design A descriptive correlational design was used to explore illness representations. Population, Sample, Setting A convenience sample of 85 individuals with Stage 3 CKD was obtained from a Midwestern VA medical center.  Respondents’ mean age was 69.2 years (range 50 - 89), predominately male, Caucasian, living with a partner, described their income as being just enough, and reported being diagnosed with CKD 36 months (median).  Co-morbidity included diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease with average of 12.4 prescribed medications.  Concept                                                                                                           The study was guided by Leventhal’s common sense model. Methods A mailed survey was used to collect demographic information and elicit participants’ perception of their illness and treatment. IPQ-R items were scored from 1 to 5 with higher scores indicating perceptions of higher personal and treatment control of chronic, cyclical illness with serious consequences and negative emotional reactions.  Descriptive statistics were used to analyze data. Preliminary Findings   All 17 symptoms were perceived as related to CKD by at least one respondent with most reporting legs and feet swelling (n=29), fatigue (n=26), and loss of strength (n=21).  Top perceived causes of CKD were aging (62.9%) and diet or eating habits (51.9%).  The CKD timeline was perceived as more chronic than acute (mean 3.7 v 2.1), with minimal cyclical exacerbations (mean 3.1), and moderate severity of consequences (mean 3.1).  Respondents perceived having more personal control than treatment control of CKD (means 3.5 v 3.1).  They did not perceive CKD as related to a great negative emotional response (mean 2.8). Conclusion Findings indicate that understanding patients’ perceptions of CKD may be important for nurses to effectively facilitate healthy self-management behaviors and improved health care alternatives. Implications    This study will provide a basis for future studies aimed at understanding CKD patient perspectives.  
Keywords:
Common Sense Model; Chronic Kidney Disease; Illness Representation
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIllness Representations of Chronic Kidney Disease: Preliminary Findingsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201945-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Objective Describe illness and treatment beliefs of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Design A descriptive correlational design was used to explore illness representations. Population, Sample, Setting A convenience sample of 85 individuals with Stage 3 CKD was obtained from a Midwestern VA medical center.  Respondents’ mean age was 69.2 years (range 50 - 89), predominately male, Caucasian, living with a partner, described their income as being just enough, and reported being diagnosed with CKD 36 months (median).  Co-morbidity included diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease with average of 12.4 prescribed medications.  Concept                                                                                                           The study was guided by Leventhal’s common sense model. Methods A mailed survey was used to collect demographic information and elicit participants’ perception of their illness and treatment. IPQ-R items were scored from 1 to 5 with higher scores indicating perceptions of higher personal and treatment control of chronic, cyclical illness with serious consequences and negative emotional reactions.  Descriptive statistics were used to analyze data. Preliminary Findings   All 17 symptoms were perceived as related to CKD by at least one respondent with most reporting legs and feet swelling (n=29), fatigue (n=26), and loss of strength (n=21).  Top perceived causes of CKD were aging (62.9%) and diet or eating habits (51.9%).  The CKD timeline was perceived as more chronic than acute (mean 3.7 v 2.1), with minimal cyclical exacerbations (mean 3.1), and moderate severity of consequences (mean 3.1).  Respondents perceived having more personal control than treatment control of CKD (means 3.5 v 3.1).  They did not perceive CKD as related to a great negative emotional response (mean 2.8). Conclusion Findings indicate that understanding patients’ perceptions of CKD may be important for nurses to effectively facilitate healthy self-management behaviors and improved health care alternatives. Implications    This study will provide a basis for future studies aimed at understanding CKD patient perspectives.  en_GB
dc.subjectCommon Sense Modelen_GB
dc.subjectChronic Kidney Diseaseen_GB
dc.subjectIllness Representationen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:01:33Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:01:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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