A Healthier Chicago Lighthouse: Changing Wellness-Related Attitudes One at a Time

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201948
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Healthier Chicago Lighthouse: Changing Wellness-Related Attitudes One at a Time
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Research indicates that individuals with disabilities in the United States, as well as throughout the world, have higher rates of obesity. Weil et al. (2002) found that individuals who were blind or visually impaired were 1.5 times more likely to be obese than the general U.S. population. Lower socioeconomic status, lack of knowledge or skills to engage in healthier eating habits or exercise, difficulty with transportation to grocery stores or exercise facilities, and lack of social support comprise often insurmountable obstacles for individuals with disabilities.  Despite government few proven interventions for individuals who are blind or visually impaired, exist.           The Chicago Lighthouse for People who are Blind or Visually Impaired offers multiple programs and services to meet the needs of individuals who are blind, visually impaired, or multi-disabled.  A staff of approximately 200 individuals serves clients across the lifespan. A needs assessment and subsequent data analysis informed implementation of a workplace wellness program targeting overweight/obesity and lack of physical activity.          System barriers included lack of policies and procedures supporting workplace wellness, inadequate equipment, time, and space for physical activity, and limited healthy food and beverage choices. A 10 week program was developed to improve health knowledge and behaviors to enhance participants’ quality of life.           Eighty two individuals aged 6 to 92 and three canine service animals participated in the 10 week weight loss and facilitated exercise. Activities included an all-ages community walk, and healthy tastings.  At the conclusion of the ten week program observation and self- report revealed that each of the program goals had been met and surpassed. References Weil E., Wachterman, M., McCarthy, E. P., Davis, R. B., O’Day, B., Lezzoni, L. I., &           Wee, C. C. (2002). Obesity among adults with disabling conditions. Journal of the           American Medical Association, 288(10), 1265–1268.
Keywords:
Obesity; Collaborative Partnerships; Blindness
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Healthier Chicago Lighthouse: Changing Wellness-Related Attitudes One at a Timeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201948-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Research indicates that individuals with disabilities in the United States, as well as throughout the world, have higher rates of obesity. Weil et al. (2002) found that individuals who were blind or visually impaired were 1.5 times more likely to be obese than the general U.S. population. Lower socioeconomic status, lack of knowledge or skills to engage in healthier eating habits or exercise, difficulty with transportation to grocery stores or exercise facilities, and lack of social support comprise often insurmountable obstacles for individuals with disabilities.  Despite government few proven interventions for individuals who are blind or visually impaired, exist.           The Chicago Lighthouse for People who are Blind or Visually Impaired offers multiple programs and services to meet the needs of individuals who are blind, visually impaired, or multi-disabled.  A staff of approximately 200 individuals serves clients across the lifespan. A needs assessment and subsequent data analysis informed implementation of a workplace wellness program targeting overweight/obesity and lack of physical activity.          System barriers included lack of policies and procedures supporting workplace wellness, inadequate equipment, time, and space for physical activity, and limited healthy food and beverage choices. A 10 week program was developed to improve health knowledge and behaviors to enhance participants’ quality of life.           Eighty two individuals aged 6 to 92 and three canine service animals participated in the 10 week weight loss and facilitated exercise. Activities included an all-ages community walk, and healthy tastings.  At the conclusion of the ten week program observation and self- report revealed that each of the program goals had been met and surpassed. References Weil E., Wachterman, M., McCarthy, E. P., Davis, R. B., O’Day, B., Lezzoni, L. I., &           Wee, C. C. (2002). Obesity among adults with disabling conditions. Journal of the           American Medical Association, 288(10), 1265–1268.en_GB
dc.subjectObesityen_GB
dc.subjectCollaborative Partnershipsen_GB
dc.subjectBlindnessen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:01:43Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:01:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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