2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201949
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Systematic Approach to Analyzing Simulation Experiences
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) A retrospective analysis of a Critical Care Simulation elective course offered an opportunity to observe the improvement of student nurse perceptions of clinical judgments over time as they cared for high fidelity patient simulators with complex needs on eight different occasions. The purpose of this presentation is to (a) provide an overview of the course, (b) describe how the students were prepared for the activities of the course, and (c) review the components of each of the simulation experiences as they related to the Nursing Education Simulation Framework (Jeffries & Rogers, 2007). Examples of the components of the framework included attention to the concepts of teacher, student, educational practices, simulation design characteristics, and outcomes. The outcomes of interest were student responses to the Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric (LCJR) (Lasater, 2007), derived from Tanner’s Clinical Judgment Model (Tanner, 2006). The use of the rubric as a data collection instrument permitted the students an opportunity to reflect upon and assess their performances during each simulation following debriefing sessions. Dimensions of Clinical Judgments were rated as exemplary, accomplished, developing, and beginning for each of the students. The dimensions included (a) effective noticing, which involves focused observation, recognizing deviations from expected patterns, and information seeking, (b) effective interpreting, which involves prioritizing data,  and making sense of data, (c) effective responding, which involves calm, confident manner, clear communication, well-planned intervention, and being skillful, and (d) effective reflecting which involves evaluation/self-analysis and commitment to improvement. The results of this analysis will provide a systematic approach to assess the quality of the simulation experiences within a course as well as analyze the student outcomes of perceptions of clinical judgments. The goal is to link improvement in the quality of a simulation experience with improvement in perceptions of clinical judgment, a necessary component for quality healthcare.
Keywords:
Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric; High fidelity human patient simulation; Nursing Education Simulation Framework
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Systematic Approach to Analyzing Simulation Experiencesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201949-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) A retrospective analysis of a Critical Care Simulation elective course offered an opportunity to observe the improvement of student nurse perceptions of clinical judgments over time as they cared for high fidelity patient simulators with complex needs on eight different occasions. The purpose of this presentation is to (a) provide an overview of the course, (b) describe how the students were prepared for the activities of the course, and (c) review the components of each of the simulation experiences as they related to the Nursing Education Simulation Framework (Jeffries & Rogers, 2007). Examples of the components of the framework included attention to the concepts of teacher, student, educational practices, simulation design characteristics, and outcomes. The outcomes of interest were student responses to the Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric (LCJR) (Lasater, 2007), derived from Tanner’s Clinical Judgment Model (Tanner, 2006). The use of the rubric as a data collection instrument permitted the students an opportunity to reflect upon and assess their performances during each simulation following debriefing sessions. Dimensions of Clinical Judgments were rated as exemplary, accomplished, developing, and beginning for each of the students. The dimensions included (a) effective noticing, which involves focused observation, recognizing deviations from expected patterns, and information seeking, (b) effective interpreting, which involves prioritizing data,  and making sense of data, (c) effective responding, which involves calm, confident manner, clear communication, well-planned intervention, and being skillful, and (d) effective reflecting which involves evaluation/self-analysis and commitment to improvement. The results of this analysis will provide a systematic approach to assess the quality of the simulation experiences within a course as well as analyze the student outcomes of perceptions of clinical judgments. The goal is to link improvement in the quality of a simulation experience with improvement in perceptions of clinical judgment, a necessary component for quality healthcare.en_GB
dc.subjectLasater Clinical Judgment Rubricen_GB
dc.subjectHigh fidelity human patient simulationen_GB
dc.subjectNursing Education Simulation Frameworken_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:01:46Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:01:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.