Physical Activity in Teens: Influence of Gender and Socioeconomic Status

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201951
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Physical Activity in Teens: Influence of Gender and Socioeconomic Status
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose: The purpose of this analysis was to assess differences in types of physical activity and places where teens are physically active between males and females and between students at high and low socioeconomic status (SES) schools. Background: Physical activity is an important component of a healthy lifestyle.  Boys and teens living in higher SES neighborhoods are typically more physically active.  Less is understood about the types of physical activities teens participate in based on their gender and SES.  Methods: Independent-samples t-tests were conducted with a convenience sample of 404 high school students with a mean age of 15.1 years. Participants were sampled from required health/physical education classes in the Southwest region of the United States.  Results: Significant differences existed in the types of physical activities teens participated in as well as how often they go to places to be physically active. Boys reported more frequent physical activity at basketball courts (p=.001), playing fields (p=.035), and at the YMCA/Boys and Girls club (p=.019).  Girls reported being more active at shopping malls (p=.000).  Students at the low SES school reported walking to school more (p=.000).  Students at the high SES school reported greater frequency in exercising at a gym outside of school (p=.000) and playing a sport at school or another organized club (p=.000).  Implications: Understanding the influence of gender and SES status on physical activity can assist in tailoring interventions to meet the needs of those participating. Students at low SES schools would benefit from activities planned at local fields or with active transport to school.  Students at high SES schools would benefit from encouragement to participate in organized sports.  Targeting physical activity for girls at a shopping mall may be effective and planning activities at local basketball courts or fields may encourage boys to be physically active.
Keywords:
Gender; Physical activity; Socioeconomic status
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePhysical Activity in Teens: Influence of Gender and Socioeconomic Statusen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201951-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose: The purpose of this analysis was to assess differences in types of physical activity and places where teens are physically active between males and females and between students at high and low socioeconomic status (SES) schools. Background: Physical activity is an important component of a healthy lifestyle.  Boys and teens living in higher SES neighborhoods are typically more physically active.  Less is understood about the types of physical activities teens participate in based on their gender and SES.  Methods: Independent-samples t-tests were conducted with a convenience sample of 404 high school students with a mean age of 15.1 years. Participants were sampled from required health/physical education classes in the Southwest region of the United States.  Results: Significant differences existed in the types of physical activities teens participated in as well as how often they go to places to be physically active. Boys reported more frequent physical activity at basketball courts (p=.001), playing fields (p=.035), and at the YMCA/Boys and Girls club (p=.019).  Girls reported being more active at shopping malls (p=.000).  Students at the low SES school reported walking to school more (p=.000).  Students at the high SES school reported greater frequency in exercising at a gym outside of school (p=.000) and playing a sport at school or another organized club (p=.000).  Implications: Understanding the influence of gender and SES status on physical activity can assist in tailoring interventions to meet the needs of those participating. Students at low SES schools would benefit from activities planned at local fields or with active transport to school.  Students at high SES schools would benefit from encouragement to participate in organized sports.  Targeting physical activity for girls at a shopping mall may be effective and planning activities at local basketball courts or fields may encourage boys to be physically active.en_GB
dc.subjectGenderen_GB
dc.subjectPhysical activityen_GB
dc.subjectSocioeconomic statusen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:01:53Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:01:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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