2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201968
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Strategies to Curb Bullying in Nursing Education
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) The exposure to bullying toward nursing faculty and program directors has been increasing over the last 4 years. Reports of incivility toward nursing faculty by students has been steadily reported in a host of national and international studies. The first report of bullying toward U.S. nursing academic administrators confirmed that one third reported experiencing bullying within the last year. Most interesting, the primary offender was nursing faculty and the second offender was students. The concept of "upward bullying" was originally reported in Australia toward non-nursing managers and has relevance when discussion bullying toward administrators. A reivew of literature on incivility toward nursing faculty and directors will be explored along with suggestions for curtailing this type of offensive behavior in the nursing academic workplace. Of great concern are the stress- related costs, such as absenteeism, decreased productivity and resignation, along with high financial costs to an organization if proper intervention is not instituted.
Keywords:
interventions; bullying; education
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStrategies to Curb Bullying in Nursing Educationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201968-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) The exposure to bullying toward nursing faculty and program directors has been increasing over the last 4 years. Reports of incivility toward nursing faculty by students has been steadily reported in a host of national and international studies. The first report of bullying toward U.S. nursing academic administrators confirmed that one third reported experiencing bullying within the last year. Most interesting, the primary offender was nursing faculty and the second offender was students. The concept of "upward bullying" was originally reported in Australia toward non-nursing managers and has relevance when discussion bullying toward administrators. A reivew of literature on incivility toward nursing faculty and directors will be explored along with suggestions for curtailing this type of offensive behavior in the nursing academic workplace. Of great concern are the stress- related costs, such as absenteeism, decreased productivity and resignation, along with high financial costs to an organization if proper intervention is not instituted.en_GB
dc.subjectinterventionsen_GB
dc.subjectbullyingen_GB
dc.subjecteducationen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:02:52Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:02:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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