2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201975
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Stigma Experiences in Persons with Non-Malignant Chronic Pain
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Aim.  The aim of this presentation is to discuss the invisible stigma shared by a group of Mexican- American women with chronic pain.  Background:  Those who share a common illness can be considered cultural subgroups, with beliefs and values influencing their health-related behaviors toward the common illness.  Through the use of ethnographic research findings, providers can enhance their own cultural competence related to specific illnesses. Cultural constructions surrounding the shared experience of stigmatizing experiences in the chronic pain condition will be presented.  Method.  The study employed a focused ethnographic approach using interview data, participant observations, and fieldwork. Field data were generated from a pain support group and pain management clinic.   Findings. Stigmatizing situations included protocols for taking pain medication, inability to carry out gendered role functions, and having an illness that does not fit into the medical model. These areas all caused stress for participants, yet were not discussed with providers.  Conclusions. Ethnographic research, tailored to increase understanding about those sharing a cultural subgroup of a common medical condition, can enhance provider cultural competence. Use of these finding allow focused guidance and coaching related to stigmatizing experiences.    
Keywords:
Chronic Pain; Clinical Medical Ethnography; Stigma
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStigma Experiences in Persons with Non-Malignant Chronic Painen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201975-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Aim.  The aim of this presentation is to discuss the invisible stigma shared by a group of Mexican- American women with chronic pain.  Background:  Those who share a common illness can be considered cultural subgroups, with beliefs and values influencing their health-related behaviors toward the common illness.  Through the use of ethnographic research findings, providers can enhance their own cultural competence related to specific illnesses. Cultural constructions surrounding the shared experience of stigmatizing experiences in the chronic pain condition will be presented.  Method.  The study employed a focused ethnographic approach using interview data, participant observations, and fieldwork. Field data were generated from a pain support group and pain management clinic.   Findings. Stigmatizing situations included protocols for taking pain medication, inability to carry out gendered role functions, and having an illness that does not fit into the medical model. These areas all caused stress for participants, yet were not discussed with providers.  Conclusions. Ethnographic research, tailored to increase understanding about those sharing a cultural subgroup of a common medical condition, can enhance provider cultural competence. Use of these finding allow focused guidance and coaching related to stigmatizing experiences.    en_GB
dc.subjectChronic Painen_GB
dc.subjectClinical Medical Ethnographyen_GB
dc.subjectStigmaen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:03:16Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:03:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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