Cesarean Section Mothers' Perception of Benefits Associated with Skin-to-Skin Contact

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201978
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cesarean Section Mothers' Perception of Benefits Associated with Skin-to-Skin Contact
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose: The purpose of this IRB approved nursing research study was to describe Cesarean Section mothers' perception of benefits associated with performing Skin-To-Skin Contact with their newborn infants immediately following delivery in the Labor and Delivery Unit. Methods: Research has identified benefits associated with Skin-To-Skin Contact for both new mothers and their infants. Nevertheless, application of this valuable bonding technique varies greatly among hospitals. Direct care nurses observed a dichotomy in the birthing experience of mothers having scheduled Cesarean Sections (C/S) in comparison to mothers having normal vaginal deliveries. C/S mothers had to wait much longer before they could hold their newborn infants and perform Skin-To-Skin Contact with them. Through a collaborative RN/MD initiative, barriers were identified and eliminated. This IRB-approved nursing research study used a non-experimental, qualitative design to describe C/S mothers' perception of benefits associated with performing Skin-To-Skin Contact with their newborn infants immediately following delivery in the Labor and Delivery Unit. Ramona Mercer's Maternal Attachment Theory was used as the conceptual framework for the study. Data was collected using a semi-structured interview, which was tape recorded. Data analysis was conducted using Van Manen's phenomenological method with line by line isolation of thematic statements. Essential themes and subthemes emerged which illuminated the lived experience of C/S mothers. Results: Findings indicated that performing Skin-To-Skin Contact immediately following delivery in the Labor and Delivery Unit decreased C/S mothers anxiety regarding infant safety, improved their trust/confidence in the nurses and improved their overall satisfaction with the birthing experience. Conclusion: Information gained from this nursing research study should be used to empower direct care nurses working in Mother/Baby settings to change current practices and improve the quality of mothers ' birthing experience through the use of Skin-To-Skin Contact and other evidence-based nursing practices.
Keywords:
Improving C/S Mothers' Birthing Experience; Skin-To-Skin Contact; Cesarean Section Mothers
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCesarean Section Mothers' Perception of Benefits Associated with Skin-to-Skin Contacten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201978-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose: The purpose of this IRB approved nursing research study was to describe Cesarean Section mothers' perception of benefits associated with performing Skin-To-Skin Contact with their newborn infants immediately following delivery in the Labor and Delivery Unit. Methods: Research has identified benefits associated with Skin-To-Skin Contact for both new mothers and their infants. Nevertheless, application of this valuable bonding technique varies greatly among hospitals. Direct care nurses observed a dichotomy in the birthing experience of mothers having scheduled Cesarean Sections (C/S) in comparison to mothers having normal vaginal deliveries. C/S mothers had to wait much longer before they could hold their newborn infants and perform Skin-To-Skin Contact with them. Through a collaborative RN/MD initiative, barriers were identified and eliminated. This IRB-approved nursing research study used a non-experimental, qualitative design to describe C/S mothers' perception of benefits associated with performing Skin-To-Skin Contact with their newborn infants immediately following delivery in the Labor and Delivery Unit. Ramona Mercer's Maternal Attachment Theory was used as the conceptual framework for the study. Data was collected using a semi-structured interview, which was tape recorded. Data analysis was conducted using Van Manen's phenomenological method with line by line isolation of thematic statements. Essential themes and subthemes emerged which illuminated the lived experience of C/S mothers. Results: Findings indicated that performing Skin-To-Skin Contact immediately following delivery in the Labor and Delivery Unit decreased C/S mothers anxiety regarding infant safety, improved their trust/confidence in the nurses and improved their overall satisfaction with the birthing experience. Conclusion: Information gained from this nursing research study should be used to empower direct care nurses working in Mother/Baby settings to change current practices and improve the quality of mothers ' birthing experience through the use of Skin-To-Skin Contact and other evidence-based nursing practices.en_GB
dc.subjectImproving C/S Mothers' Birthing Experienceen_GB
dc.subjectSkin-To-Skin Contacten_GB
dc.subjectCesarean Section Mothersen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:03:26Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:03:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.