Health Promotion and Health Risk Assessment of Professional Truck Drivers in the Southwest

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201987
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Promotion and Health Risk Assessment of Professional Truck Drivers in the Southwest
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Health Promotion and Health Risk Assessment of Professional Truck Drivers in the Southwest Purpose:   to determine health risks and health promoting behaviors of men who are professional truck drivers.  This population is at high risk for cardiovascular disease, hypertension, sexually transmitted diseases, obesity, stress, sleep deprivation, and tobacco, alcohol, drug use.  AIMS: Identify health risks of short and long haul male truck drivers using the Self Care Inventory (SCI). Identify health-promoting behaviors using the Health Promoting Lifestyle (HPLPII) and demographic questions. Methods:  A descriptive correlational design was used. Survey methods including the SCI and HPLPII, standardized demographic instruments, measurements of height, weight, blood pressure, pulse, and calculated BMI. Data was collected at New Mexico State University (NMSU) and at truck stops along the I-10 and I-25 corridor of Texas and New Mexico. Institutional Review Board approval was acquired from NMSU and the University of Texas at Austin.  Findings:  127 drivers participated; ranging in age from 20-71.  Based on Diastolic BP 93 drivers readings fell in the Pre-Hypertension, Stage I or Stage II Hypertension and based on both systolic and diastolic readings combined 9 drivers’ BP fell in normal range and 116 drivers were in the Pre-hypertension, Stage I or Stage II categories.  Calculation of BMI revealed that 1 driver was underweight, 15 drivers had healthy weights and that 109 drivers weights were Class I, II, III, and overweight categories.  Weight was positively correlated with Diastolic BP (p = 0.0036) and the greater the weight the greater the Systolic BP (p = 0.0003). Conclusions:  Risk factors for health problems included poor diet and lack of exercise. Levels of hypertension are greater than in prior reports of truck driver health risks.  Drivers identified ways they are incorporating exercise into their daily routines which can be used in health promotion educational materials.
Keywords:
truck driver; health risk; health promoting behaviors
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Promotion and Health Risk Assessment of Professional Truck Drivers in the Southwesten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201987-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Health Promotion and Health Risk Assessment of Professional Truck Drivers in the Southwest Purpose:   to determine health risks and health promoting behaviors of men who are professional truck drivers.  This population is at high risk for cardiovascular disease, hypertension, sexually transmitted diseases, obesity, stress, sleep deprivation, and tobacco, alcohol, drug use.  AIMS: Identify health risks of short and long haul male truck drivers using the Self Care Inventory (SCI). Identify health-promoting behaviors using the Health Promoting Lifestyle (HPLPII) and demographic questions. Methods:  A descriptive correlational design was used. Survey methods including the SCI and HPLPII, standardized demographic instruments, measurements of height, weight, blood pressure, pulse, and calculated BMI. Data was collected at New Mexico State University (NMSU) and at truck stops along the I-10 and I-25 corridor of Texas and New Mexico. Institutional Review Board approval was acquired from NMSU and the University of Texas at Austin.  Findings:  127 drivers participated; ranging in age from 20-71.  Based on Diastolic BP 93 drivers readings fell in the Pre-Hypertension, Stage I or Stage II Hypertension and based on both systolic and diastolic readings combined 9 drivers’ BP fell in normal range and 116 drivers were in the Pre-hypertension, Stage I or Stage II categories.  Calculation of BMI revealed that 1 driver was underweight, 15 drivers had healthy weights and that 109 drivers weights were Class I, II, III, and overweight categories.  Weight was positively correlated with Diastolic BP (p = 0.0036) and the greater the weight the greater the Systolic BP (p = 0.0003). Conclusions:  Risk factors for health problems included poor diet and lack of exercise. Levels of hypertension are greater than in prior reports of truck driver health risks.  Drivers identified ways they are incorporating exercise into their daily routines which can be used in health promotion educational materials.en_GB
dc.subjecttruck driveren_GB
dc.subjecthealth risken_GB
dc.subjecthealth promoting behaviorsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:03:55Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:03:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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