A Cultural Method Used to Investigate Breast and Colorectal Cancer Screening Knowledge and Decision Aids Among Hispanic Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201993
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Cultural Method Used to Investigate Breast and Colorectal Cancer Screening Knowledge and Decision Aids Among Hispanic Women
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Breast and colorectal cancer (CRC) together account for nearly 22% of the cancer mortality burden in South Texas. Yet cancer screening use is unacceptably low, particularly among Hispanic women. Little is known about these women’s cancer screening knowledge and decision aids in rural or urban Coastal Bend settings. Two traditional cafecitos were conducted to explore Hispanic women’s opinions of the content and structure of informative and effective decision aids. Cafecitos are small, traditional, informal discussions among similar people with coffee and pan dulce (sugar-free sweet breads). The settings were in a semi-rural Nueces county South Texas colonia as well as an urban setting with women aged 50-70 years of age. Recordings were transcribed and data from the two groups were coded and analyzed for frequencies of relevant content themes. Results indicate that women (n = 21) had little education about both breast andCRC screenings. Women revealed misinformation about their personal risk and early stage diagnoses for both cancers. These findings indicate strong participant interest in communication strategies necessary to understand and reduce the risk of developing breast and CRC. Faith/religiosity, fatalism, external locus of control, and familialism played a large role in screening decision aid tools. Future nursing interventions should focus their efforts on all four components. According to women’s suggestions, several decision aid tools should be incorporated and presented together as one large and more comprehensive decision aid tool to help individuals make informed decisions. These findings have global implications for women because of our commonalities as women. All women need information about their personal risk of developing targeted cancers and ways to reduce their cancer risk in formats that are meaningful to them. Global networks of women, health providers, family, and friends can be effective dissemination tools to advocate breast and CRC screening.  
Keywords:
screening; Hispanic women
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Cultural Method Used to Investigate Breast and Colorectal Cancer Screening Knowledge and Decision Aids Among Hispanic Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201993-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Breast and colorectal cancer (CRC) together account for nearly 22% of the cancer mortality burden in South Texas. Yet cancer screening use is unacceptably low, particularly among Hispanic women. Little is known about these women’s cancer screening knowledge and decision aids in rural or urban Coastal Bend settings. Two traditional cafecitos were conducted to explore Hispanic women’s opinions of the content and structure of informative and effective decision aids. Cafecitos are small, traditional, informal discussions among similar people with coffee and pan dulce (sugar-free sweet breads). The settings were in a semi-rural Nueces county South Texas colonia as well as an urban setting with women aged 50-70 years of age. Recordings were transcribed and data from the two groups were coded and analyzed for frequencies of relevant content themes. Results indicate that women (n = 21) had little education about both breast andCRC screenings. Women revealed misinformation about their personal risk and early stage diagnoses for both cancers. These findings indicate strong participant interest in communication strategies necessary to understand and reduce the risk of developing breast and CRC. Faith/religiosity, fatalism, external locus of control, and familialism played a large role in screening decision aid tools. Future nursing interventions should focus their efforts on all four components. According to women’s suggestions, several decision aid tools should be incorporated and presented together as one large and more comprehensive decision aid tool to help individuals make informed decisions. These findings have global implications for women because of our commonalities as women. All women need information about their personal risk of developing targeted cancers and ways to reduce their cancer risk in formats that are meaningful to them. Global networks of women, health providers, family, and friends can be effective dissemination tools to advocate breast and CRC screening.  en_GB
dc.subjectscreeningen_GB
dc.subjectHispanic womenen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:04:14Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:04:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.