Developing the Leadership Capacities of Clinical Educators: The Leadership and Clinical Education (LaCE) Initiative

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201996
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Developing the Leadership Capacities of Clinical Educators: The Leadership and Clinical Education (LaCE) Initiative
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose Despite the centrality of clinical practice to nursing education, experience in the real world does not automatically lead to positive student learning experiences or the development of required competencies. There is abundant literature describing the reality of clinical practice for undergraduate students and difficulties surrounding the actuality of initiating and sustaining clinical environments that are conducive to learning. This suggests that, unless the cultural milieu which surrounds students’ clinical experience is supportive of learning and underpinned by strong clinical leadership, quality clinical learning may remain problematic. This project aimed to enhance the quality of student learning in the clinical setting through strengthening the clinical leadership capacity of staff involved in the clinical supervision of undergraduate nursing students. Methods Working in partnership with three Brisbane hospitals, a leadership framework of clinical education (LaCE) was developed and operationalised through a purpose-built program (the LaCE Program) which had three interconnected components: workshops, personal development projects and an online LaCE toolkit. The framework, program and accompanying resources were informed by critical iterative feedback from a national network of key stakeholders to ensure that project outcomes had the potential for mainstreaming across the sector. Results Quantitative and qualitative methods were used to evaluate project outcomes. Survey results indicate that participants’ confidence in providing direction and promoting clinical learning, facilitating working relationships, clinical teaching and role development were significantly increased. These results were supported by focus group and interview data from participants and industry partners. Conclusions  Facilitating student learning in the clinical setting is complex and challenging. Findings from this project indicate that leadership capacity building for clinical educators can lead to strengthened commitment to the role, increased innovation regarding clinical learning and teaching and greater confidence to be proactive with students and staff. We believe initiatives such as LaCE have significant potential to facilitate quality learning and teaching in the clinical setting.
Keywords:
clinical education; leadership
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeveloping the Leadership Capacities of Clinical Educators: The Leadership and Clinical Education (LaCE) Initiativeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/201996-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Purpose Despite the centrality of clinical practice to nursing education, experience in the real world does not automatically lead to positive student learning experiences or the development of required competencies. There is abundant literature describing the reality of clinical practice for undergraduate students and difficulties surrounding the actuality of initiating and sustaining clinical environments that are conducive to learning. This suggests that, unless the cultural milieu which surrounds students’ clinical experience is supportive of learning and underpinned by strong clinical leadership, quality clinical learning may remain problematic. This project aimed to enhance the quality of student learning in the clinical setting through strengthening the clinical leadership capacity of staff involved in the clinical supervision of undergraduate nursing students. Methods Working in partnership with three Brisbane hospitals, a leadership framework of clinical education (LaCE) was developed and operationalised through a purpose-built program (the LaCE Program) which had three interconnected components: workshops, personal development projects and an online LaCE toolkit. The framework, program and accompanying resources were informed by critical iterative feedback from a national network of key stakeholders to ensure that project outcomes had the potential for mainstreaming across the sector. Results Quantitative and qualitative methods were used to evaluate project outcomes. Survey results indicate that participants’ confidence in providing direction and promoting clinical learning, facilitating working relationships, clinical teaching and role development were significantly increased. These results were supported by focus group and interview data from participants and industry partners. Conclusions  Facilitating student learning in the clinical setting is complex and challenging. Findings from this project indicate that leadership capacity building for clinical educators can lead to strengthened commitment to the role, increased innovation regarding clinical learning and teaching and greater confidence to be proactive with students and staff. We believe initiatives such as LaCE have significant potential to facilitate quality learning and teaching in the clinical setting.en_GB
dc.subjectclinical educationen_GB
dc.subjectleadershipen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:04:24Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:04:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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