Social Conflict: How Does it Influence Mental Health for Enlisted Army Female Service Members?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202000
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Social Conflict: How Does it Influence Mental Health for Enlisted Army Female Service Members?
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Background: The importance of post-deployment social support has been substantiated to attenuate the effects of combat deployment on mental health outcomes for female service members (FSMs). However, the influence of social conflict on mental health symptom severity during this period has not been investigated. Methods:  This descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional design examined the nature of the relationships that social support, social conflict, and stressful life events have with post-traumatic stress, anxiety, and depression symptom severity in a sample of 137 enlisted active duty Army female service members 6-12 months after re-deploying from Iraq.  Secondly, it sought to determine whether the absence of social support, or the presence of social conflict, was more influential in the severity of these mental health symptoms. Results: There were significant positive bivariate correlations (p < .01) between social conflict and stressful life events and each of the three outcome variables: PTSD, depression, and anxiety symptoms. Likewise, there were significant negative bivariate correlations (p < .01) between social support and each of the three outcome variables. After controlling for co-morbid mental health symptoms, hierarchical linear regression showed that greater PTSD symptom severity was best explained by greater post-deployment stressful life events and of the presence of social conflict.  Anxiety symptom severity was best explained by the absence of perceived social support and the presence of conflict.  And in contrast, greater depression symptom severity was best explained by the absence of social support.   Discussion & Implications for Nursing:  There must be careful assessment for the presence of interpersonal conflict, the absence of social support, and the presence of additional life stressors in FSMs presenting with mental health symptoms post-deployment. Resilience in these women could potentially be improved by early assessment of these factors with specific interventions geared toward diminishing their effects on mental health symptom severity.
Keywords:
military; social conflict; social support
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSocial Conflict: How Does it Influence Mental Health for Enlisted Army Female Service Members?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202000-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Background: The importance of post-deployment social support has been substantiated to attenuate the effects of combat deployment on mental health outcomes for female service members (FSMs). However, the influence of social conflict on mental health symptom severity during this period has not been investigated. Methods:  This descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional design examined the nature of the relationships that social support, social conflict, and stressful life events have with post-traumatic stress, anxiety, and depression symptom severity in a sample of 137 enlisted active duty Army female service members 6-12 months after re-deploying from Iraq.  Secondly, it sought to determine whether the absence of social support, or the presence of social conflict, was more influential in the severity of these mental health symptoms. Results: There were significant positive bivariate correlations (p < .01) between social conflict and stressful life events and each of the three outcome variables: PTSD, depression, and anxiety symptoms. Likewise, there were significant negative bivariate correlations (p < .01) between social support and each of the three outcome variables. After controlling for co-morbid mental health symptoms, hierarchical linear regression showed that greater PTSD symptom severity was best explained by greater post-deployment stressful life events and of the presence of social conflict.  Anxiety symptom severity was best explained by the absence of perceived social support and the presence of conflict.  And in contrast, greater depression symptom severity was best explained by the absence of social support.   Discussion & Implications for Nursing:  There must be careful assessment for the presence of interpersonal conflict, the absence of social support, and the presence of additional life stressors in FSMs presenting with mental health symptoms post-deployment. Resilience in these women could potentially be improved by early assessment of these factors with specific interventions geared toward diminishing their effects on mental health symptom severity.en_GB
dc.subjectmilitaryen_GB
dc.subjectsocial conflicten_GB
dc.subjectsocial supporten_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:04:37Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:04:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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