Students' Perception of Self-Confidence in High-Fidelity Simulation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202006
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Students' Perception of Self-Confidence in High-Fidelity Simulation
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) ABSTRACT Nurse educators consistently evaluate students and methods of learning within the classroom, laboratory, and practice settings. Part of this evaluative process involves testing the knowledge that the student has gained within the course. Most students in nursing programs develop this knowledge by attending lectures and through demonstration, but this does not always meet the needs of every student (Jeffries, 2001). Self- confidence is built when an exam is taken and successfully passed. This is a good strategy to evaluate a students’ progress, but does not address self-confidence in the clinical setting. High-fidelity simulation (HFS) is one of the many ways educators are meeting the need to impact the clinical learning experience and build self-confidence in students. The purpose of this evidence-based project was to answer the question: How do junior BSN students perceive their self-confidence after taking part in a high-fidelity simulation experience?  Kolb’s experiential learning theory was used as a framework to guide the simulation project at a university in the Midwest. A one-group (N = 96) descriptive design was used to answer the PICO question. The “Learner Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning” (LSSCL) scale was used to gather data related to self-confidence. Descriptive statistics were analyzed. Three quarters of the class felt confident that they were mastering the content of the simulation experience. The majority (97%) of students felt confident that the simulation covered critical content necessary for the mastery of medical/surgical curriculum and indicated that they were developing the skills and knowledge required from the simulation experience. Implications for educational practice will be discussed.   Keywords: nursing education, high-fidelity simulation, self-confidence, simulation, undergraduate nursing student
Keywords:
Undergraduate nursing students; Self-Confidence; High-fidelity simulation
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStudents' Perception of Self-Confidence in High-Fidelity Simulationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202006-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) ABSTRACT Nurse educators consistently evaluate students and methods of learning within the classroom, laboratory, and practice settings. Part of this evaluative process involves testing the knowledge that the student has gained within the course. Most students in nursing programs develop this knowledge by attending lectures and through demonstration, but this does not always meet the needs of every student (Jeffries, 2001). Self- confidence is built when an exam is taken and successfully passed. This is a good strategy to evaluate a students’ progress, but does not address self-confidence in the clinical setting. High-fidelity simulation (HFS) is one of the many ways educators are meeting the need to impact the clinical learning experience and build self-confidence in students. The purpose of this evidence-based project was to answer the question: How do junior BSN students perceive their self-confidence after taking part in a high-fidelity simulation experience?  Kolb’s experiential learning theory was used as a framework to guide the simulation project at a university in the Midwest. A one-group (N = 96) descriptive design was used to answer the PICO question. The “Learner Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning” (LSSCL) scale was used to gather data related to self-confidence. Descriptive statistics were analyzed. Three quarters of the class felt confident that they were mastering the content of the simulation experience. The majority (97%) of students felt confident that the simulation covered critical content necessary for the mastery of medical/surgical curriculum and indicated that they were developing the skills and knowledge required from the simulation experience. Implications for educational practice will be discussed.   Keywords: nursing education, high-fidelity simulation, self-confidence, simulation, undergraduate nursing studenten_GB
dc.subjectUndergraduate nursing studentsen_GB
dc.subjectSelf-Confidenceen_GB
dc.subjectHigh-fidelity simulationen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:04:57Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:04:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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