Describing Symptom Clusters in Persons with Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS) Using Focus Groups

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202010
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Describing Symptom Clusters in Persons with Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS) Using Focus Groups
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Significance. Symptoms of relapsing remitting MS are variable and unpredictable. The range of symptoms may be due to disease course or treatment and can increase disability and costs. Limited knowledge also exists as to whether these symptoms enhance or magnify one another. Framework: The theoretical framework is based on the Symptom Management Model (Dodd et al., 2001). Purpose/ Aims:  The purpose will be to explore symptom clusters in persons with RRMS. Symptom cluster research in other diseases, such as cancer and heart disease; provide strong evidence of the clinical value of identifying symptom clusters. The aims are to 1): fully characterize symptoms experienced by patients with RRMS, the most prevalent MS subtype; and 2) to validate the revised symptom list generated (Aim 1) in patients with RRMS. Method: Three auto taped focus groups comprised of persons with RRMS (n = 30), Setting and Sample. Saint Louis University and Veterans Administration MS clinics.  Planned Analysis: The sample will be described using descriptive statistics, and the frequencies of the (content analysis) symptoms noted. The characteristics of the sample recruited for Aim 1 will be described with descriptive statistics, and the prevalence of individual symptoms and the most frequent combinations of symptoms described. In the newly developed checklist scale, planned analyses will be to examine agreement between the focus group statements and the established MS Related Symptom Scale (MS-RS) (Gulick, 1989) using the Kappa coefficient, which calculates agreement between categorical data while correcting for chance agreement. Data will be compared and contrasted across individuals, and gender, or ethnicity groups. Implications Understanding of symptom clusters and their likelihood of co-occurring can assist nursing and other disciplines to prioritize care and anticipate needs.   Characterization of symptom clusters holds promise for future assessment and therapies for specific subgroups of persons with MS.
Keywords:
focus groups; multiple sclerosis; symptoms
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDescribing Symptom Clusters in Persons with Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS) Using Focus Groupsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202010-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Significance. Symptoms of relapsing remitting MS are variable and unpredictable. The range of symptoms may be due to disease course or treatment and can increase disability and costs. Limited knowledge also exists as to whether these symptoms enhance or magnify one another. Framework: The theoretical framework is based on the Symptom Management Model (Dodd et al., 2001). Purpose/ Aims:  The purpose will be to explore symptom clusters in persons with RRMS. Symptom cluster research in other diseases, such as cancer and heart disease; provide strong evidence of the clinical value of identifying symptom clusters. The aims are to 1): fully characterize symptoms experienced by patients with RRMS, the most prevalent MS subtype; and 2) to validate the revised symptom list generated (Aim 1) in patients with RRMS. Method: Three auto taped focus groups comprised of persons with RRMS (n = 30), Setting and Sample. Saint Louis University and Veterans Administration MS clinics.  Planned Analysis: The sample will be described using descriptive statistics, and the frequencies of the (content analysis) symptoms noted. The characteristics of the sample recruited for Aim 1 will be described with descriptive statistics, and the prevalence of individual symptoms and the most frequent combinations of symptoms described. In the newly developed checklist scale, planned analyses will be to examine agreement between the focus group statements and the established MS Related Symptom Scale (MS-RS) (Gulick, 1989) using the Kappa coefficient, which calculates agreement between categorical data while correcting for chance agreement. Data will be compared and contrasted across individuals, and gender, or ethnicity groups. Implications Understanding of symptom clusters and their likelihood of co-occurring can assist nursing and other disciplines to prioritize care and anticipate needs.   Characterization of symptom clusters holds promise for future assessment and therapies for specific subgroups of persons with MS.en_GB
dc.subjectfocus groupsen_GB
dc.subjectmultiple sclerosisen_GB
dc.subjectsymptomsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:05:11Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:05:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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