Two Hospitals Collaborate to Reduce Medication Errors Using Human Factors Approaches

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202034
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Two Hospitals Collaborate to Reduce Medication Errors Using Human Factors Approaches
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Background/Purpose Human factors science is an important consideration in preventing medication errors as interruptions continue to be leading causes of medication errors. Teamwork often helps prevent influences of outside forces upon the nurse during medication administration. The purpose of the study was to determine whether specific but different interventions at two hospitals in different cities would reduce medication errors and whether nurses would perceive a decrease in interruptions.  Methods Interventions in Hospital A included: a quiet zone, education, signs, checklist, and nurses carrying red folders containing medication sheets as a sign to not interrupt. Interventions in Hospital B included: a quiet zone, education, signs, checklist, and wearing of a sash as a symbol not to interrupt. Nurses were surveyed using Psychdata via email about number and type of interruptions during medication administration before and after interventions. SPSS 18.0 was used to analyze data.  Results The sample of nurses (n = 236) completing the survey pre and post intervention included: 91% females (n = 215), and 9% males (n = 21) aged 23-67 (µ = 42). Education levels were: LVN (3%; n =7), ADN (35.6%; n = 84), Diploma (7.2%; n = 17), BSN (51.3%; n = 121), MSN or other (3%; n = 7). ANOVA showed significant mean differences based on hospital setting, and that Hospital B reported higher levels of interruptions (p <.001). While there was no change in medication errors with Hospital A, Hospital B reported a 49% decrease compared to the previous five months. Both hospitals demonstrated mean decreases in many interruption categories.  Conclusion Our research demonstrates that specific interventions reduce medication errors and interruptions for nurses. The most affected categories of interruptions will be described. The need for further research to improve safe medication administration using human factors approaches as a global initiative will be emphasized.
Keywords:
human factors; medication safety; interruptions
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTwo Hospitals Collaborate to Reduce Medication Errors Using Human Factors Approachesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202034-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Background/Purpose Human factors science is an important consideration in preventing medication errors as interruptions continue to be leading causes of medication errors. Teamwork often helps prevent influences of outside forces upon the nurse during medication administration. The purpose of the study was to determine whether specific but different interventions at two hospitals in different cities would reduce medication errors and whether nurses would perceive a decrease in interruptions.  Methods Interventions in Hospital A included: a quiet zone, education, signs, checklist, and nurses carrying red folders containing medication sheets as a sign to not interrupt. Interventions in Hospital B included: a quiet zone, education, signs, checklist, and wearing of a sash as a symbol not to interrupt. Nurses were surveyed using Psychdata via email about number and type of interruptions during medication administration before and after interventions. SPSS 18.0 was used to analyze data.  Results The sample of nurses (n = 236) completing the survey pre and post intervention included: 91% females (n = 215), and 9% males (n = 21) aged 23-67 (µ = 42). Education levels were: LVN (3%; n =7), ADN (35.6%; n = 84), Diploma (7.2%; n = 17), BSN (51.3%; n = 121), MSN or other (3%; n = 7). ANOVA showed significant mean differences based on hospital setting, and that Hospital B reported higher levels of interruptions (p <.001). While there was no change in medication errors with Hospital A, Hospital B reported a 49% decrease compared to the previous five months. Both hospitals demonstrated mean decreases in many interruption categories.  Conclusion Our research demonstrates that specific interventions reduce medication errors and interruptions for nurses. The most affected categories of interruptions will be described. The need for further research to improve safe medication administration using human factors approaches as a global initiative will be emphasized.en_GB
dc.subjecthuman factorsen_GB
dc.subjectmedication safetyen_GB
dc.subjectinterruptionsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:06:29Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:06:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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