Fact or Fiction?: Busting the Myths Surrounding New Graduate RN Transition

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202039
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Fact or Fiction?: Busting the Myths Surrounding New Graduate RN Transition
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Despite a variety of supportive initiatives, new graduate Registered Nurses (RNs) continue to report significant challenges when making the shift from academia to professional practice. The stressors associated with transition have been widely studied for decades; however, more recent work in this area suggests that new graduate RNs often experience a debilitating period of “transition shock” (Duchscher, 2001).  Persistent stress is associated with burnout, a phenomenon known to hamper retention of new graduate RNs.  In Canada, burnout can occur within the first two years of practice (Canadian Nurses’ Association, 2006), with a significant number of new graduates leaving nursing positions and/or the profession itself.  Successful integration of new graduates into professional practice is imperative for a sustainable nursing workforce, and a safe, effective health care system. Currently, new RN transition strategies rely primarily on mentoring models that exist at the workplace level.  There is emerging recognition of the need for a continuum of transition support that begins earlier, bridging the academic and the employment sectors.  Recognizing this need, and using the best evidence, an innovative fourth year level course was designed to ease the transition of BScN candidates in the final semester of their nursing program.  This presentation highlights the development and implementation of a double-weighted fourth year level course that is taken concurrently with clinical preceptorship.  Drawing upon the support of community partners, university career development resources, and former students, BScN candidates differentiate between ‘fact’ and ‘fiction’ when exploring current issues in transition, including ethical distress, interprofessional collaboration, and intergenerational conflict. In the self-directed component of the course, students apply evidence-based practice to ‘bust’ a myth related to a contemporary nursing practice topic of interest.  Student outcomes and implications for successful transition will be discussed.
Keywords:
nursing education; transition; new graduate nurse
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFact or Fiction?: Busting the Myths Surrounding New Graduate RN Transitionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202039-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Despite a variety of supportive initiatives, new graduate Registered Nurses (RNs) continue to report significant challenges when making the shift from academia to professional practice. The stressors associated with transition have been widely studied for decades; however, more recent work in this area suggests that new graduate RNs often experience a debilitating period of “transition shock” (Duchscher, 2001).  Persistent stress is associated with burnout, a phenomenon known to hamper retention of new graduate RNs.  In Canada, burnout can occur within the first two years of practice (Canadian Nurses’ Association, 2006), with a significant number of new graduates leaving nursing positions and/or the profession itself.  Successful integration of new graduates into professional practice is imperative for a sustainable nursing workforce, and a safe, effective health care system. Currently, new RN transition strategies rely primarily on mentoring models that exist at the workplace level.  There is emerging recognition of the need for a continuum of transition support that begins earlier, bridging the academic and the employment sectors.  Recognizing this need, and using the best evidence, an innovative fourth year level course was designed to ease the transition of BScN candidates in the final semester of their nursing program.  This presentation highlights the development and implementation of a double-weighted fourth year level course that is taken concurrently with clinical preceptorship.  Drawing upon the support of community partners, university career development resources, and former students, BScN candidates differentiate between ‘fact’ and ‘fiction’ when exploring current issues in transition, including ethical distress, interprofessional collaboration, and intergenerational conflict. In the self-directed component of the course, students apply evidence-based practice to ‘bust’ a myth related to a contemporary nursing practice topic of interest.  Student outcomes and implications for successful transition will be discussed.en_GB
dc.subjectnursing educationen_GB
dc.subjecttransitionen_GB
dc.subjectnew graduate nurseen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:06:47Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:06:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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