2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202048
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationahip Between Health Literacy and Educational Materials
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Background: Low health literacy is a global health problem. In recognition of this problem in the U.S., the Joint Commission identified the need to present educational material in an understandable manner. However, the literature is still unclear about how health care beneficiaries and providers identify “understandable.” Purpose:  The purpose of this research study was to (a) compare participant preferences in health education materials to their scores on the REALM and (b) determine if health care provider participants ranked education materials differently from non-health care provider participants. Methods:  Participants were recruited at two student-run health fairs. After securing informed consent, student researchers asked the participants to rank the perceived usefulness of educational materials commonly distributed to patients. The materials ranged from college to fifth grade reading levels. Health literacy was assessed using the REALM; demographic data were also collected. Results: A total of 49 adults participated in the health fairs. Ages ranged from 24 to 82 years; 14 were health care providers (HCP), and 35 were non-health care providers (NHCP). All but two participants reported to be at least high school graduates.  REALM scores ranged from fourth-sixth grade to high school.  The majority of both HCP and NHCP chose the specifically designed easy-to-read brochure as their first choice regardless of REALM scores. There was a difference, however, when looking at the groups who did not choose the easy to read brochures as most useful. Conclusions/Implications for Practice: Regardless of last grade completed, the majority of the participants preferred the brochure created at a sixth grade level following the principles of readability. When choosing educational materials, HCPs should keep the principles of readability in mind.  Offering materials that are perceived to be useful may encourage clients to examine the materials, improve self management of disease, and improve outcomes.
Keywords:
Health literacy; Patient education
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationahip Between Health Literacy and Educational Materialsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202048-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Background: Low health literacy is a global health problem. In recognition of this problem in the U.S., the Joint Commission identified the need to present educational material in an understandable manner. However, the literature is still unclear about how health care beneficiaries and providers identify “understandable.” Purpose:  The purpose of this research study was to (a) compare participant preferences in health education materials to their scores on the REALM and (b) determine if health care provider participants ranked education materials differently from non-health care provider participants. Methods:  Participants were recruited at two student-run health fairs. After securing informed consent, student researchers asked the participants to rank the perceived usefulness of educational materials commonly distributed to patients. The materials ranged from college to fifth grade reading levels. Health literacy was assessed using the REALM; demographic data were also collected. Results: A total of 49 adults participated in the health fairs. Ages ranged from 24 to 82 years; 14 were health care providers (HCP), and 35 were non-health care providers (NHCP). All but two participants reported to be at least high school graduates.  REALM scores ranged from fourth-sixth grade to high school.  The majority of both HCP and NHCP chose the specifically designed easy-to-read brochure as their first choice regardless of REALM scores. There was a difference, however, when looking at the groups who did not choose the easy to read brochures as most useful. Conclusions/Implications for Practice: Regardless of last grade completed, the majority of the participants preferred the brochure created at a sixth grade level following the principles of readability. When choosing educational materials, HCPs should keep the principles of readability in mind.  Offering materials that are perceived to be useful may encourage clients to examine the materials, improve self management of disease, and improve outcomes.en_GB
dc.subjectHealth literacyen_GB
dc.subjectPatient educationen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:07:15Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:07:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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