A Risky Sex Prevention Intervention for Hispanic Middle School Girls

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202060
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Risky Sex Prevention Intervention for Hispanic Middle School Girls
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Background: Hispanic adolescent girls are significantly more likely to contract HIV than white girls (CDC, 2008), and they contract the disease at a younger age than African-Americans or whites (NC DHHS, 2009). Behaviors that put Hispanic youth at risk for HIV include having sex at an early age, having sex without using a condom, having sex with multiple partners, and having sex while under the influence of drugs or alcohol (CDC, 2008, 2009). No intervention has adequately addressed the disproportionate rate of HIV infection among Hispanic girls. Method: Using a risk and protective factors framework we designed an intervention to address this disparity that aims to build pride in the girls’ culture. Elements of the intervention include education for the girls about HIV, healthy relationships, communication, and ways to reduce risk. Mothers of the girls receive education that includes challenges their daughters face and the importance of monitoring and role modeling on their daughters' behavior. The girls practice their communication skills during a structured service learning experience. A convenience sample of 11 Hispanic girls, ages 11-14, and their mothers were enrolled. A pre-test/post-test with 3 month follow-up design was used. Girl measures included ethnic pride, HIV knowledge, assertiveness, and aspects of mother-daughter communication. Mother measures included acculturation and aspects of mother-daughter communication. Feasibility was examined throughout the study and included evaluations by the girls, the mothers, and the Hispanic nurse interveners. Results: Preliminary results indicate the intervention was well received by the participants. Preliminary efficacy data will be presented. Conclusion: A risky sex prevention intervention that is specifically tailored for Hispanic girls and their mothers may be useful in helping these girls avoid risky sex behaviors that put them at risk for HIV. Paying special attention to linguistic and transportation issues is important for successful recruitment and retention.
Keywords:
risky sex; adolescent girls; Hispanic
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Risky Sex Prevention Intervention for Hispanic Middle School Girlsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202060-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Background: Hispanic adolescent girls are significantly more likely to contract HIV than white girls (CDC, 2008), and they contract the disease at a younger age than African-Americans or whites (NC DHHS, 2009). Behaviors that put Hispanic youth at risk for HIV include having sex at an early age, having sex without using a condom, having sex with multiple partners, and having sex while under the influence of drugs or alcohol (CDC, 2008, 2009). No intervention has adequately addressed the disproportionate rate of HIV infection among Hispanic girls. Method: Using a risk and protective factors framework we designed an intervention to address this disparity that aims to build pride in the girls’ culture. Elements of the intervention include education for the girls about HIV, healthy relationships, communication, and ways to reduce risk. Mothers of the girls receive education that includes challenges their daughters face and the importance of monitoring and role modeling on their daughters' behavior. The girls practice their communication skills during a structured service learning experience. A convenience sample of 11 Hispanic girls, ages 11-14, and their mothers were enrolled. A pre-test/post-test with 3 month follow-up design was used. Girl measures included ethnic pride, HIV knowledge, assertiveness, and aspects of mother-daughter communication. Mother measures included acculturation and aspects of mother-daughter communication. Feasibility was examined throughout the study and included evaluations by the girls, the mothers, and the Hispanic nurse interveners. Results: Preliminary results indicate the intervention was well received by the participants. Preliminary efficacy data will be presented. Conclusion: A risky sex prevention intervention that is specifically tailored for Hispanic girls and their mothers may be useful in helping these girls avoid risky sex behaviors that put them at risk for HIV. Paying special attention to linguistic and transportation issues is important for successful recruitment and retention.en_GB
dc.subjectrisky sexen_GB
dc.subjectadolescent girlsen_GB
dc.subjectHispanicen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:07:54Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:07:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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