Teaching Recovering Substance-Abusing Mothers the Practice of Infant Massage via Different Strategies: Parenting Stress, Depression, Self-Esteem, Maternal-Infant Interaction, and Self-Efficacy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202063
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Teaching Recovering Substance-Abusing Mothers the Practice of Infant Massage via Different Strategies: Parenting Stress, Depression, Self-Esteem, Maternal-Infant Interaction, and Self-Efficacy
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of a blended infant massage- parenting enhancement program (IMPEP) on parenting stress, self-esteem, and maternal-infant interaction among recovering substance-abusing mothers (SAMs). The adverse effects of perinatal substance abuse are complex, including heightened maternal stress, altered self esteem, and limited parenting effectiveness. Impaired infant development can result from failure to establish positive mother- infant interactions. This study used a randomized, controlled three-group design with repeated measures over time, comparing the impact of 2 levels of treatment and control conditions on maternal health outcomes. The procedures sequenced as follows: a) informed consent and baseline assessment (T1); b) 4 weekly IMPEP or PEP intervention sessions; c) post intervention assessment (T2); and d) follow-up assessment (T3). The data, collected using Abidin’s Parenting Stress Scale (PS), Rosenberg’s Self-Esteem Scale (SE), Mueller’s Maternal-Infant Attachment Scale (MIA), and Background Information Questionnaire, were analyzed with descriptive, Kruskall-Wallis ANOVA, and post hoc MANN-Whitney U tests. The sample was composed of 37% Black, 17% Hispanic, and 41% White; the majority being single and had completed 7-12 years of education. Study groups differed in SE level in favor of the IMPEP. Both IMPEP and PEP groups showed significant within-group changes in parenting stress as compared to the Control group. IMPEP SAMs showed significantly greater attachment to their infants at T2 and T3. Both treatment groups showed significant difference in MIA as compared to the control. The IM factor appears to have value-added effect on maternal health comes. Incorporation of psychomotor activity, e.g., infant massage, in parenting skills enhancement programs may prove to be beneficial.  It behooves health care professionals to develop cost-effective means of parenting skills enhancement, building upon the natural components of early mother-infant interactions. Global replication of the study merits consideration to establish the generalizability of the findings.
Keywords:
Blended Infant Massage-Parenting Enahncement Program; American Sign Language; Mother-Peer Teaching
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTeaching Recovering Substance-Abusing Mothers the Practice of Infant Massage via Different Strategies: Parenting Stress, Depression, Self-Esteem, Maternal-Infant Interaction, and Self-Efficacyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202063-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of a blended infant massage- parenting enhancement program (IMPEP) on parenting stress, self-esteem, and maternal-infant interaction among recovering substance-abusing mothers (SAMs). The adverse effects of perinatal substance abuse are complex, including heightened maternal stress, altered self esteem, and limited parenting effectiveness. Impaired infant development can result from failure to establish positive mother- infant interactions. This study used a randomized, controlled three-group design with repeated measures over time, comparing the impact of 2 levels of treatment and control conditions on maternal health outcomes. The procedures sequenced as follows: a) informed consent and baseline assessment (T1); b) 4 weekly IMPEP or PEP intervention sessions; c) post intervention assessment (T2); and d) follow-up assessment (T3). The data, collected using Abidin’s Parenting Stress Scale (PS), Rosenberg’s Self-Esteem Scale (SE), Mueller’s Maternal-Infant Attachment Scale (MIA), and Background Information Questionnaire, were analyzed with descriptive, Kruskall-Wallis ANOVA, and post hoc MANN-Whitney U tests. The sample was composed of 37% Black, 17% Hispanic, and 41% White; the majority being single and had completed 7-12 years of education. Study groups differed in SE level in favor of the IMPEP. Both IMPEP and PEP groups showed significant within-group changes in parenting stress as compared to the Control group. IMPEP SAMs showed significantly greater attachment to their infants at T2 and T3. Both treatment groups showed significant difference in MIA as compared to the control. The IM factor appears to have value-added effect on maternal health comes. Incorporation of psychomotor activity, e.g., infant massage, in parenting skills enhancement programs may prove to be beneficial.  It behooves health care professionals to develop cost-effective means of parenting skills enhancement, building upon the natural components of early mother-infant interactions. Global replication of the study merits consideration to establish the generalizability of the findings.en_GB
dc.subjectBlended Infant Massage-Parenting Enahncement Programen_GB
dc.subjectAmerican Sign Languageen_GB
dc.subjectMother-Peer Teachingen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:08:04Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:08:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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