2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202064
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Generation Differences Among African-Americans
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Abstract Research on generational differences has largely addressed the "average" Caucasian American individual.  These categories currently include: “maturer", "veterans"’ or “builders” born between 1920-1945; “boomers" born between 1946 -1964; “generation X”, "Xer", or ‘busters” born between 1965 – 1980; and “generation Y”, "Yer", or "millennials" born after 1981 (Gaylor, 2002; Siela, 2006). There are specific key events for each of these generations that formulated that generation's values and traits.   Strauss and Howe (1991) surmise that no matter whom you are, the events of the time, the politics, the social, and economic institutions will mold your behaviors.  However it is felt that demographic, social reality of race, and ethnicity are important and not just sential events. This research took a profound direction regarding education expectations.  Grounded theory was used to provide insight and enhance understanding of these differences.  Thirty African Americans, 18-83 years of age participated in individual interviews with one of the researchers. Generational differences among Caucasians are not similar to those of the study participants.  In fact family, culture, and education are the most life altering influenced in an average Black family.  The “maturers” stated that their parents had high expectations for them even though they did not have the best situation to flourish.  The “Yers” have a completely different perspective on expectation and success. Taking these elements into consideration will make a stronger transcultural interaction among races and ethnicity.  Armed with this insight, structuring education to breach the gap between expectations and success will benefit all elements of life. References: Gaylor, D. (2002). Generational Differences.  Retrieved on December 16, 2006 from           http://www.ats.wilmore.ky.us/academics/biacl/notebook/07/watson_appendix1.pdf Siela, D. (2006). Managing the multigenerational nursing staff.  American Nursing             Today, 47-50. Strauss,W. & Howe, N (1991).  Generations:  The History of America’s futures, 1584 to 2069.   W. Morrow and Company, Inc:  New York.
Keywords:
generational differences; transculture
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGeneration Differences Among African-Americansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202064-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Abstract Research on generational differences has largely addressed the "average" Caucasian American individual.  These categories currently include: “maturer", "veterans"’ or “builders” born between 1920-1945; “boomers" born between 1946 -1964; “generation X”, "Xer", or ‘busters” born between 1965 – 1980; and “generation Y”, "Yer", or "millennials" born after 1981 (Gaylor, 2002; Siela, 2006). There are specific key events for each of these generations that formulated that generation's values and traits.   Strauss and Howe (1991) surmise that no matter whom you are, the events of the time, the politics, the social, and economic institutions will mold your behaviors.  However it is felt that demographic, social reality of race, and ethnicity are important and not just sential events. This research took a profound direction regarding education expectations.  Grounded theory was used to provide insight and enhance understanding of these differences.  Thirty African Americans, 18-83 years of age participated in individual interviews with one of the researchers. Generational differences among Caucasians are not similar to those of the study participants.  In fact family, culture, and education are the most life altering influenced in an average Black family.  The “maturers” stated that their parents had high expectations for them even though they did not have the best situation to flourish.  The “Yers” have a completely different perspective on expectation and success. Taking these elements into consideration will make a stronger transcultural interaction among races and ethnicity.  Armed with this insight, structuring education to breach the gap between expectations and success will benefit all elements of life. References: Gaylor, D. (2002). Generational Differences.  Retrieved on December 16, 2006 from           http://www.ats.wilmore.ky.us/academics/biacl/notebook/07/watson_appendix1.pdf Siela, D. (2006). Managing the multigenerational nursing staff.  American Nursing             Today, 47-50. Strauss,W. & Howe, N (1991).  Generations:  The History of America’s futures, 1584 to 2069.   W. Morrow and Company, Inc:  New York.en_GB
dc.subjectgenerational differencesen_GB
dc.subjecttranscultureen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:08:08Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:08:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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