Unheard Voices: Documenting Internationally Educated Nurses' Experiences in the Nursing Workforce

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202069
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Unheard Voices: Documenting Internationally Educated Nurses' Experiences in the Nursing Workforce
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Globalization has affected various financial and economic sectors, including the health care labour market. Internationally educated nurses (IENs), for example, are being recruited to Canada in increasing numbers to address acute nursing shortages. This trend is not new, nor isolated to Canada, but it does raise questions about how this influx has impacted both IENs and their Canadian nursing colleagues. We conducted a qualitative study to explore the experiences of internationally educated nurses and understand the processes of professional, cultural, and social integration into their new workplaces. It was devised to explore: 1) the nature of Filipino nurses’ experiences of working in a Canadian Midwest province in the first three years after immigration; 2) the nature of Canadian born nurses’ experiences of working with internationally educated nurses. Guided by a postcolonial feminist theoretical approach, the study explored how structural factors like race, gender, ethnicity, culture, and the socio-political context intersect with internationally educated nurses’ perceptions of professional, cultural and social integration in the nursing workforce. Data was collected through open-ended individual interviews and participant observation sessions. Based on Carspecken’s work, thematic content analysis was used to analyze data. Findings reveal that the internationally educated nurses experienced feelings of social and cultural isolation and homesickness. It also made evident a number of other issues that need to be addressed: cultural adaptation to living in Canada, communications between health care providers, interdisciplinary work, caring for First Nations’ patient needs, and how Canadian nurses’ concerns can cast doubt on the IENs’ professional competency. From this session, participants will 1) become familiar with the challenges of professional and cultural integration and 2) learn to develop evidence-based strategies to facilitate internationally educated nurses’ professional integration in the nursing workforce.
Keywords:
Professional Integration; Transcultural Nursing; Race Relations
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUnheard Voices: Documenting Internationally Educated Nurses' Experiences in the Nursing Workforceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202069-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Globalization has affected various financial and economic sectors, including the health care labour market. Internationally educated nurses (IENs), for example, are being recruited to Canada in increasing numbers to address acute nursing shortages. This trend is not new, nor isolated to Canada, but it does raise questions about how this influx has impacted both IENs and their Canadian nursing colleagues. We conducted a qualitative study to explore the experiences of internationally educated nurses and understand the processes of professional, cultural, and social integration into their new workplaces. It was devised to explore: 1) the nature of Filipino nurses’ experiences of working in a Canadian Midwest province in the first three years after immigration; 2) the nature of Canadian born nurses’ experiences of working with internationally educated nurses. Guided by a postcolonial feminist theoretical approach, the study explored how structural factors like race, gender, ethnicity, culture, and the socio-political context intersect with internationally educated nurses’ perceptions of professional, cultural and social integration in the nursing workforce. Data was collected through open-ended individual interviews and participant observation sessions. Based on Carspecken’s work, thematic content analysis was used to analyze data. Findings reveal that the internationally educated nurses experienced feelings of social and cultural isolation and homesickness. It also made evident a number of other issues that need to be addressed: cultural adaptation to living in Canada, communications between health care providers, interdisciplinary work, caring for First Nations’ patient needs, and how Canadian nurses’ concerns can cast doubt on the IENs’ professional competency. From this session, participants will 1) become familiar with the challenges of professional and cultural integration and 2) learn to develop evidence-based strategies to facilitate internationally educated nurses’ professional integration in the nursing workforce.en_GB
dc.subjectProfessional Integrationen_GB
dc.subjectTranscultural Nursingen_GB
dc.subjectRace Relationsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:08:24Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:08:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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