Feasibility of Using the Severity of Gastrointestinal Impairment Instrument in Clinical Practice

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202071
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Feasibility of Using the Severity of Gastrointestinal Impairment Instrument in Clinical Practice
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Background There is no consensus on the definition of intolerance to enteral nutrition (EN), the constellation of signs and symptoms that should be assessed to indicate intolerance, and no assessment tools used in practice to measure EN intolerance. Tolerance is influenced by gastrointestinal (GI) tract function. Clinical manifestations of GI impairment that may contribute to EN intolerance include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation and abdominal distension. Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of using a new researcher-developed assessment tool, the Severity of Gastrointestinal Impairment (SOGI) to better define EN intolerance and assess the severity of GI impairment in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation and receiving EN in the critical care setting. Methods A descriptive exploratory design was used to assess the feasibility of using the SOGI in clinical practice using four critical care nurses who assessed up to three critical care patients each across the first 3 days of EN. The nurses were interviewed regarding the ease of use and pertinence of the SOGI. Results None of the patients assessed with the SOGI experienced significant GI impairment. Constipation was the most frequent finding, and variation in the definition of diarrhea among the nurses was noted. Of those patients assessed with the SOGI (N=11), there was one documented elevation in gastric residual volume (< 250 mL over the last 24 hours), as well as one report of diarrhea (the patient had experienced 4 or more liquid stools in the prior 24 hours) and constipation was reported 3 times. Of those who experienced constipation, one had not passed stool in 4-5 days and two individuals had gone > 5 days without passing stool. There was insufficient data to perform psychometric testing. Implications Each of the components in the SOGI should be independently studied for evidence of reliability and validity.  
Keywords:
critical care; enteral nutrition; intolerance
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFeasibility of Using the Severity of Gastrointestinal Impairment Instrument in Clinical Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202071-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Background There is no consensus on the definition of intolerance to enteral nutrition (EN), the constellation of signs and symptoms that should be assessed to indicate intolerance, and no assessment tools used in practice to measure EN intolerance. Tolerance is influenced by gastrointestinal (GI) tract function. Clinical manifestations of GI impairment that may contribute to EN intolerance include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation and abdominal distension. Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of using a new researcher-developed assessment tool, the Severity of Gastrointestinal Impairment (SOGI) to better define EN intolerance and assess the severity of GI impairment in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation and receiving EN in the critical care setting. Methods A descriptive exploratory design was used to assess the feasibility of using the SOGI in clinical practice using four critical care nurses who assessed up to three critical care patients each across the first 3 days of EN. The nurses were interviewed regarding the ease of use and pertinence of the SOGI. Results None of the patients assessed with the SOGI experienced significant GI impairment. Constipation was the most frequent finding, and variation in the definition of diarrhea among the nurses was noted. Of those patients assessed with the SOGI (N=11), there was one documented elevation in gastric residual volume (< 250 mL over the last 24 hours), as well as one report of diarrhea (the patient had experienced 4 or more liquid stools in the prior 24 hours) and constipation was reported 3 times. Of those who experienced constipation, one had not passed stool in 4-5 days and two individuals had gone > 5 days without passing stool. There was insufficient data to perform psychometric testing. Implications Each of the components in the SOGI should be independently studied for evidence of reliability and validity.  en_GB
dc.subjectcritical careen_GB
dc.subjectenteral nutritionen_GB
dc.subjectintoleranceen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:08:30Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:08:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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