Neonatal Morbidity and Mortality Related to Induction of Labor Prior to 39 Weeks Gestation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202086
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Neonatal Morbidity and Mortality Related to Induction of Labor Prior to 39 Weeks Gestation
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Infant mortality rate, number of infant deaths per 1000 live births, is a globally accepted indicator of national health. Infant mortality statistics (2005) indicate that the US ranks 30th in the world with an infant mortality rate of 6.9 deaths per 1000 live births. One cause cited throughout the literature is a rise in number of preterm births to a rate of 12.8 per 100 live births in 2006.  Births between 34 and 36 weeks gestation account for approximately 75% of all preterm births. Concomitantly, there has been a rise in labor induction, particularly elective labor induction, prior to 39 weeks gestation.  According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG, 2009), the overall labor induction rate doubled from 1990 to 2006 to 225 per 1000 live births. ACOG also reported that up to 20% of elective inductions are performed before 39 weeks gestation and that infant harm from elective delivery is greater prior to 39 weeks. The purpose of this retrospective, descriptive study is to analyze merged Texas Birth and Infant Death Certificate data using exploratory, descriptive, and statistical methods. Aims of the study are to quantify and trend rates of labor induction prior to 39 weeks gestation over a five-year period, 2003 – 2007 (most current available), and to examine infant morbidity and mortality related to labor induction, stratifying by gestational age and geographic region. Data from a sample of approximately two million Texas births may provide evidence supporting adoption of clinical policies encouraging obstetric providers to follow guidelines designed to promote patient safety and prevent infant morbidity and mortality. Examining neonatal outcomes related to induction may provide data for nurses and others that educate parents for use in development of prenatal and childbirth education addressing disadvantages and risks of elective induction prior to 39 weeks gestation.
Keywords:
Morbidity; Labor induction; Neonate
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNeonatal Morbidity and Mortality Related to Induction of Labor Prior to 39 Weeks Gestationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202086-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Infant mortality rate, number of infant deaths per 1000 live births, is a globally accepted indicator of national health. Infant mortality statistics (2005) indicate that the US ranks 30th in the world with an infant mortality rate of 6.9 deaths per 1000 live births. One cause cited throughout the literature is a rise in number of preterm births to a rate of 12.8 per 100 live births in 2006.  Births between 34 and 36 weeks gestation account for approximately 75% of all preterm births. Concomitantly, there has been a rise in labor induction, particularly elective labor induction, prior to 39 weeks gestation.  According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG, 2009), the overall labor induction rate doubled from 1990 to 2006 to 225 per 1000 live births. ACOG also reported that up to 20% of elective inductions are performed before 39 weeks gestation and that infant harm from elective delivery is greater prior to 39 weeks. The purpose of this retrospective, descriptive study is to analyze merged Texas Birth and Infant Death Certificate data using exploratory, descriptive, and statistical methods. Aims of the study are to quantify and trend rates of labor induction prior to 39 weeks gestation over a five-year period, 2003 – 2007 (most current available), and to examine infant morbidity and mortality related to labor induction, stratifying by gestational age and geographic region. Data from a sample of approximately two million Texas births may provide evidence supporting adoption of clinical policies encouraging obstetric providers to follow guidelines designed to promote patient safety and prevent infant morbidity and mortality. Examining neonatal outcomes related to induction may provide data for nurses and others that educate parents for use in development of prenatal and childbirth education addressing disadvantages and risks of elective induction prior to 39 weeks gestation.en_GB
dc.subjectMorbidityen_GB
dc.subjectLabor inductionen_GB
dc.subjectNeonateen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:09:18Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:09:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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