The Hospitalized Infant and Separated Family: How Nurses Can Use Technology to Heal

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202090
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Hospitalized Infant and Separated Family: How Nurses Can Use Technology to Heal
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) In rural Arkansas, women’s health nurses at the state’s only academic medical center have launched and led a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit web camera (NICU webcam) project to transform how separated parents bond with their baby.  Those neonates born prematurely, at a low birth weight, or with congenital problems often experience long hospital stays after birth, leaving their families separated from their infants for many months at a time.  While the baby remains in the hospital, the mother and family must carry on life as usual, constantly wondering about the well being of their hospitalized baby.  With this separation, maternal bonding is difficult, family communication is complicated, and feelings of sadness and anxiety are heightened.   In essence, everyone suffers when a baby must be hospitalized. Obstetrical and neonatal nurses at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences sought to eradicate these challenges of family separation from hospitalized babies through an NICU-webcam pilot project. This innovation program is the first in the United States delivering real-time video of hospitalized infants directly to their remote family, often miles away in their homes.  A one-way, real-time video feed from the neonate’s bedside is transmitted to a website only accessible to family and selected NICU provider and nursing staff. Mothers and other family members log-in to this security-encrypted website where they can view live video of their NICU hospitalized infant, creating a family-centered monitoring device. A nurse-driven NICU-webcam program has the potential to increase quality of life for not only participating families but also the hospitalized infant by relieving anxiety and cultivating a distant bonding experience.  With the possibility of impacting maternal bonding, ease in infant reentry into the home, paternal and sibling attachment, lactation, anxiety, and depression, this innovative program holds promise to significantly impact mothers and their families.
Keywords:
Neonatal Intensive Care Unit; Web Camera; Technology
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Hospitalized Infant and Separated Family: How Nurses Can Use Technology to Healen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202090-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) In rural Arkansas, women’s health nurses at the state’s only academic medical center have launched and led a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit web camera (NICU webcam) project to transform how separated parents bond with their baby.  Those neonates born prematurely, at a low birth weight, or with congenital problems often experience long hospital stays after birth, leaving their families separated from their infants for many months at a time.  While the baby remains in the hospital, the mother and family must carry on life as usual, constantly wondering about the well being of their hospitalized baby.  With this separation, maternal bonding is difficult, family communication is complicated, and feelings of sadness and anxiety are heightened.   In essence, everyone suffers when a baby must be hospitalized. Obstetrical and neonatal nurses at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences sought to eradicate these challenges of family separation from hospitalized babies through an NICU-webcam pilot project. This innovation program is the first in the United States delivering real-time video of hospitalized infants directly to their remote family, often miles away in their homes.  A one-way, real-time video feed from the neonate’s bedside is transmitted to a website only accessible to family and selected NICU provider and nursing staff. Mothers and other family members log-in to this security-encrypted website where they can view live video of their NICU hospitalized infant, creating a family-centered monitoring device. A nurse-driven NICU-webcam program has the potential to increase quality of life for not only participating families but also the hospitalized infant by relieving anxiety and cultivating a distant bonding experience.  With the possibility of impacting maternal bonding, ease in infant reentry into the home, paternal and sibling attachment, lactation, anxiety, and depression, this innovative program holds promise to significantly impact mothers and their families.en_GB
dc.subjectNeonatal Intensive Care Uniten_GB
dc.subjectWeb Cameraen_GB
dc.subjectTechnologyen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:09:31Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:09:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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