Global Collaboration in Bolivia Promotes Advancement of Oncology Nursing

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202091
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Global Collaboration in Bolivia Promotes Advancement of Oncology Nursing
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Significance & Background: In South America, Bolivia is the poorest country. Over 45% of the new cases and 37% of cancer-related deaths are related to cervical and breast cancer. Major health problems result from inadequate knowledge related to cancer when diagnosed with cancer, many Bolivians are told to go home to die. In Cochabamba, a support group of cancer survivors and cancer care providers collaborated with American nurses develop cancer education and awareness. Interventions: We provided written information in Spanish and CDs demonstrating screening techniques. Over 115 individuals were screened for cancer during our community outreach. During a week-long family support group more than 70 individuals discussed cancer fears and concerns along with how to provide direct care during the illness trajectory. Health-care provider seminars addressed basic pathophysiology, treatment, and end-of-life issues. Breast examinations were taught to hospital and clinical staff. An hour-long television educational program on cancer was taped for public viewing. Evaluation: Our mission was to empower and improve care in Cochabamba. This resulted in open communication between patients, families, and clinicians. Due to language barriers and the short-term association, formal evaluations were difficult to ascertain. Informally, nurses and families voiced their confidence in the ability to now care for cancer patients. Partnerships with key stake holders continue via e-mail and plans to return to the community are evolving. Outcome: The desire to improve care, education, screening, and outreach to cancer patients established global communication between healthcare providers.  We reduced the amount of fear and stigma attached to the cancer diagnosis. In order to continue the process, Cochabamba started its first oncology nurse’s chapter. Plans are being made to offer the oncology core curriculum through one of the universities. Nurses can make a difference through collaboration, coordination, and flexibility to enhance knowledge and practice through global collaboration 
Keywords:
Oncology Nursing; Bolivia; Global Collaboration
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGlobal Collaboration in Bolivia Promotes Advancement of Oncology Nursingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202091-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Significance & Background: In South America, Bolivia is the poorest country. Over 45% of the new cases and 37% of cancer-related deaths are related to cervical and breast cancer. Major health problems result from inadequate knowledge related to cancer when diagnosed with cancer, many Bolivians are told to go home to die. In Cochabamba, a support group of cancer survivors and cancer care providers collaborated with American nurses develop cancer education and awareness. Interventions: We provided written information in Spanish and CDs demonstrating screening techniques. Over 115 individuals were screened for cancer during our community outreach. During a week-long family support group more than 70 individuals discussed cancer fears and concerns along with how to provide direct care during the illness trajectory. Health-care provider seminars addressed basic pathophysiology, treatment, and end-of-life issues. Breast examinations were taught to hospital and clinical staff. An hour-long television educational program on cancer was taped for public viewing. Evaluation: Our mission was to empower and improve care in Cochabamba. This resulted in open communication between patients, families, and clinicians. Due to language barriers and the short-term association, formal evaluations were difficult to ascertain. Informally, nurses and families voiced their confidence in the ability to now care for cancer patients. Partnerships with key stake holders continue via e-mail and plans to return to the community are evolving. Outcome: The desire to improve care, education, screening, and outreach to cancer patients established global communication between healthcare providers.  We reduced the amount of fear and stigma attached to the cancer diagnosis. In order to continue the process, Cochabamba started its first oncology nurse’s chapter. Plans are being made to offer the oncology core curriculum through one of the universities. Nurses can make a difference through collaboration, coordination, and flexibility to enhance knowledge and practice through global collaboration en_GB
dc.subjectOncology Nursingen_GB
dc.subjectBoliviaen_GB
dc.subjectGlobal Collaborationen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:09:34Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:09:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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