Health Beliefs Related to Mammography Screening Among Urban Jamaican Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/202115
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Beliefs Related to Mammography Screening Among Urban Jamaican Women
Abstract:
(41st Biennial Convention) Abstract Health Beliefs Related to Mammography Screening Among Urban Jamaican Women Ferrona Beason PhD., ARNP. Background: Mortality rates from breast cancer continue to increase in the island of Jamaica. It has been noted that most women affected with the disease have been diagnosed at a late stage. Despite increasing availability of mammography screening on the island, approximately 4% of women in that country within the recommend age group utilize this screening tool. Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is to report the findings of an exploration of the health beliefs of urban Jamaican women regarding mammography screening and to identify strategies to improve utilization of mammography screening. This presentation is part of a larger study exploring the influence of knowledge, attitudes and health beliefs toward utilizing breast cancer screening tools in this population. Theoretical Framework: The Health Belief Model (HBM) provided the major framework for this study, and the Purnell Model for Cultural Competence was used as a cultural lens to study this population. Methods: A cross-sectional, correlational design was used to examine the relationship among the major study variables. Data were analyzed using descriptive, correlation, and multiple regression statistics. A priori power analysis estimated a sample of 115 women for this study. Results: Most of the participants in the study reported never having had a mammogram. Of those who had a mammogram, less than half had yearly screenings. Results suggested that despite perceptions of more benefits than barriers to mammography screening, urban Jamaican women were less likely to perceive susceptibility to breast cancer. Conclusions: Hopefully, the results from this study will be used by nurses and other healthcare providers to develop and implement culturally appropriate interventions to reduce the morbidity and mortality rates of breast cancer among urban Jamaican women.
Keywords:
Health beliefs; Mammography screening; Jamaican women
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
4-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Beliefs Related to Mammography Screening Among Urban Jamaican Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/202115-
dc.description.abstract(41st Biennial Convention) Abstract Health Beliefs Related to Mammography Screening Among Urban Jamaican Women Ferrona Beason PhD., ARNP. Background: Mortality rates from breast cancer continue to increase in the island of Jamaica. It has been noted that most women affected with the disease have been diagnosed at a late stage. Despite increasing availability of mammography screening on the island, approximately 4% of women in that country within the recommend age group utilize this screening tool. Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is to report the findings of an exploration of the health beliefs of urban Jamaican women regarding mammography screening and to identify strategies to improve utilization of mammography screening. This presentation is part of a larger study exploring the influence of knowledge, attitudes and health beliefs toward utilizing breast cancer screening tools in this population. Theoretical Framework: The Health Belief Model (HBM) provided the major framework for this study, and the Purnell Model for Cultural Competence was used as a cultural lens to study this population. Methods: A cross-sectional, correlational design was used to examine the relationship among the major study variables. Data were analyzed using descriptive, correlation, and multiple regression statistics. A priori power analysis estimated a sample of 115 women for this study. Results: Most of the participants in the study reported never having had a mammogram. Of those who had a mammogram, less than half had yearly screenings. Results suggested that despite perceptions of more benefits than barriers to mammography screening, urban Jamaican women were less likely to perceive susceptibility to breast cancer. Conclusions: Hopefully, the results from this study will be used by nurses and other healthcare providers to develop and implement culturally appropriate interventions to reduce the morbidity and mortality rates of breast cancer among urban Jamaican women.en_GB
dc.subjectHealth beliefsen_GB
dc.subjectMammography screeningen_GB
dc.subjectJamaican womenen_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-11T11:10:50Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-04en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T11:10:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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